recycling

You are currently browsing the archive for the recycling category.

We recently spent some fun family time at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk in Santa Cruz, California. There is something so sweet and nostalgic about beach boardwalks. One of my favorite dating-my-now-husband memories was a trip we took to Ocean City’s Boardwalk in New Jersey early in our relationship. We also lived as a newly married couple in Rye, New York where we had our own beach boardwalk and Rye Playland. Rye Playland was the amusement park featured at the end of the movie Big starring Tom Hanks.

The Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk | photo: Christopher Gabriel

While we were enjoying the sun and sand at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, I was impressed with the commitment that was shown to the environment. From well placed recycling bins to prohibiting Styrofoam from all the food venues, the thoughtfulness that they put into keeping their environmental impact small was evident.

To read my article about HOW THE SANTA CRUZ BEACH BOARDWALK PRESERVES THE ENVIRONMENT, visit http://earth911.com/living-well-being/travel-living/santa-cruz-beach-boardwalk/.

Plinko at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk | photo: Wendy Gabriel

The Sky Glider at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk | photo: Wendy Gabriel

Tags: , ,

Wreaths are a great way to improve your home’s curb appeal and make a wonderful first impression when people come to your front door. You can make wreaths for any occasion, holiday and season. You can also use almost any material to make your wreath from recycled clothing to items you find in nature.

The Base of the Wreath

Metal bases are great for durability and sustainability. I have a metal wreath frame that I bought at a craft store and have used it over and over again.

squarewreathtube.jpg

I have also seen flat wooden base forms, or you could make your form from paperboard tubes that you can liberate from your recycling bin.

Here are four wreaths you can make from items you may find in your recycling bin, local thrift store or yard:

Tie Wreath

Take a trip to the thrift store (or your husband’s closet) to gather some ties to turn into a fun wreath. I embellished mine with a bow tie.

tiewreath.jpg

The amount of ties that you need will depend on the size of your wreath. Cut your ties into 15-inch-long sections. Position the narrow end of first cut tie, front side up, on a section of the wreath. Secure with glue from your hot glue gun. Wrap tie around form until pointed end is positioned as shown, hiding the rolled tie; secure with glue. Repeat, overlapping ties slightly. Flip wreath over; glue down any spot that may need it. Pin or glue on your bow tie or use a whole tie made into a bow and secure with a pin.

Recycled Greeting Card Wreath

Recycled greeting card wreaths are a great idea if you are like me and can’t throw away the cards you receive. Decide on a shape, like holly leaves, make a template (or find one online) and then start cutting. Cut out enough of your shape to completely cover your wreath base. I find going clockwise with your first layer and then filling in where you need it works great.

Check out Ruffles & Stuff for a bunch of great ways to recycle greeting cards.

Cork Wreath

If you enjoy your wine, and have already made multiple trivet and coasters with your leftover corks, this is your next project. A wreath made of wine corks would look adorable in a dining room or hanging above your wine storage.

For this wreath, you will need around 20-25 corks, two pieces of long green floral wire, 20-25 small red jingle bells and a ribbon to hang your wreath. You will need to drill a small hole in both the top and the bottom (1/4 inch from the top and bottom) of each cork. The hole needs to be big enough to fit the floral wire. Connect your corks by pushing your wire through the bottom hole first (save enough wire at the end to twist together). Then connect the tops by pushing your wire through the top holes; alternating between the corks then jingle bells. Twist wire to close on top and bottom, shape your wreath and hang your beautiful creation with a length of ribbon.

winewreath.jpg

Here are the instructions for another adorable cork wreath.

Nature Wreath

A natural wreath is beautiful and fun to create. I trimmed my rosemary bush to use for this wreath, but you could also use evergreen branches, pine cones or whatever happens to be handy. Wrap your branches around your base, securing them with twine or glue. What is an added bonus of rosemary, lavender or an evergreen wreath is the lovely scent.

rosemarywreath.jpg

The fun part about creating a wreath for your home is you can make it uniquely your own. Once you have a base, you can recycle almost anything from magazine or book pages to old t-shirts or sweaters to make your wreath.

– This was originally published at  http://recyclenation.com/ on October 09, 2015.

Tags: , ,

I’m coming up on my 5 year Write-aversary (I’m sure that’s a thing) for Recycle Nation so click on over to http://recyclenation.com/author/wendy-gabriel to see what I have been writing about.

Some recent articles include, What Can You Recycle – A Pictorial Tutorial.

Recycle

 

And, Preserving the Harvest, or Saving the Season.

Cadence harvesting strawberries

This photo makes me smile for so many reasons… wonderful memories, Cadence’s adorable smile and those yummy strawberries.

Always do your best. What you plant now, you will harvest later.  ~Og Mandino

Tags: ,

My brother-in-law is a (newly promoted) lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army and he has served two tours-of-duty inCell Phone for Soldiers South Korea, one in Iraq and is still active duty. I also have numerous relatives, including both of my Grandfathers, and friends who are veterans. So, anything that helps members of our military, is near and dear to my heart. And an organization that helps our brave men and women while helping our environment, is nothing short of amazing… one such organization is Cell Phones for Soldiers.

History

Since its inception in 2004, Cell Phones for Soldiers has worked to provide free communication services to active-duty military members and veterans. For a decade, the charity’s longstanding calling card program, Minutes That Matter has provided servicemen and women with an estimated 3 million prepaid calling cards, equating to more than 210 million minutes of FREE talk time.

Cell Phones for Soldiers fuels it’s mission through generous monetary contributions and the recycling of donated mobile phones. Newer or gently-used mobile phones from all service providers are accepted. Each $5 contribution, or donated device valued at $5, will provide troops with 2.5 hours of FREE talk time.

Cell Phones for Soldiers was founded by Robbie and Brittany Bergquist of Norwell, Mass., at the ages of 12 andRob and Brittany Bergquist, Founders of Cell Phones for Soldiers 13. The organization has prevented more than 11.3 million cell phones from ending up in landfills.

“Cell Phones for Soldiers started as a small way to show our family’s appreciation for the men and women who have sacrificed the day-to-day contact with their own families to serve in the U.S. armed forces,” says charity President, Bob Bergquist. “Over the past few years, we have been overwhelmed by the generosity of others. But, we have also seen the need to support our troops continue to grow as more troops are sent overseas for longer assignments.”

Why is recycling cell phones so important?

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), electronic waste (e-waste) is accumulating almost three times faster than ordinary household trash and an estimated 100 to 130 million cell phones are no longer being used, many sitting unused in storage.

Recycling cell phones reduces greenhouse gas emissions, keeps valuable material out of
landfills and incinerators, and conserves natural resources. Cell phones and accessories are made from valuable resources such as precious metals, copper, and plastics – all of which require energy to extract and manufacture.

According to the EPA, if Americans recycled 100 million phones, we could save enough upstream energy to power more than 194,000 U.S. households for a year. If consumers were able to reuse those 100 million cell phones, the environmental savings would be even greater, saving enough energy to power more than 370,000 U.S. homes each year.

The EPA has targeted cell phone recycling because fewer than 20 percent of cell phones are recycled each year and most people do not know where to recycle them.

How can you help?

Donate your unused cellphones. Phones can be sent directly to Cell Phones for Soldiers’ recycling partner at the address listed below or can be dropped off at any of the Cell Phones for Soldiers official drop-off sites, find your local drop-off location at http://www.cellphonesforsoldiers.com/zipcodeLocator.php.

To become an official Cell Phones for Soldiers drop-off location sign up at http://www.cellphonesforsoldiers.com/drop_off.php.

Cell Phones for Soldiers
4500 Cambridge Rd, Dock Door 9/10
Fort Worth, TX 76155-2234

You can also give a monetary contribution, visit http://www.cellphonesforsoldiers.com/donate_now.php to find out more.

What happens to your phone once it’s dropped off?

All cell phones donated to Cell Phones for Soldiers are sold either to an electronic refurbisher or a recycler. Once the charity receives a donated cell phone, the device is quickly wiped of all personal information and checked to see if it is repairable. A cell phone that is repairable is sold to an electronic refurbisher who will repair the device and resell it in the aftermarket. However, cell phones that are either too old or completely broken are sold to recyclers who strip the devices of any salvageable components and/or rare metals and then responsibly recycle the remaining parts. The proceeds from the phones are used to purchase prepaid international calling cards for troops and provide emergency financial assistance to veterans.

While only one day of the year is dedicated solely to honoring our veterans, Americans must never forget the sacrifices that many of our fellow countrymen have made to defend our country and protect our freedoms.  ~Randy Neugebauer

 

Tags: , , , ,

EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. STARTING OCTOBER 13, 2014 A NEW TIME FOR THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM MEANS A NEW TIME FOR THIS SEGMENT… YOU CAN NOW STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 835AM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: America Recycles Day is November 15th. Take the time to review your city’s recycling guidelines and make sure you are doing all you can to keep recyclables out of your local landfill.

For more information about America Recycle’s Day, visit http://americarecyclesday.org/.

Here’s a look at what is allowable in the City of Fargo’s curbside recycling program:MInnKota Recycling

Cardboard: Corrugated cardboard boxes, brown kraft bags, beverage containers, shoe boxes cereal and food boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

Plastics: #1-7 Clean plastic container such as soda bottles, milk containers, detergent and shampoo bottles, yogurt & cottage cheese containers, ice cream pails, margarine tubs and vegetable containers. All containers with a recycling symbol of 1-7. REMOVE THE PLASTIC LIDS BEFORE PLACING YOUR BOTTLES IN THE RECYCLING BIN.

Newspapers and Magazines: Newspaper, shoppers and anything that is delivered in the newspaper, including glossy inserts. Magazines, small catalogs and similar printed material with glossy pages.

Aluminum and Tin Cans: Aluminum, steel and tin cans.

Glass: Clear, brown and green glass bottles and jars.

For more information about the City of Fargo’s recycling programs, visit http://www.cityoffargo.com/CityInfo/Departments/SolidWaste/Recycling/, for the City of West Fargo, visit http://www.westfargond.gov/ and for the City of Moorhead, visit http://www.ci.moorhead.mn.us/.

RECYCLING FACTS from the National Resources Defense Council and Keep America Beautiful:

  • The U.S. currently recycles 32.5 percent of its waste, compared with about five percent in 1970.
  • According to the EPA, recycling cuts global warming pollution by the equivalent of removing 39.6 million passenger cars from the road.
  • Before 1973, no curbside recycling programs existed in the United States. By 2006, about 8,660 curbside programs had sprouted up across the nation.
  • Less than half of all post-consumer paper discarded in the United States is recovered for recycling.
  • Only 13 percent of water bottles are recycled. In 2005, Americans purchased 30 billion water bottles, and 26 billion of them wound up in landfills.
  • Airports and airlines recycle less than 20 percent of the 425,000 tons of passenger-related waste they produce each year.
  • Aluminum cans have 68% recycled content. Used aluminum cans are recycled and back on the shelf as new cans in as few as 60 days.
  • Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to run your TV for three hours.
  • Recycling one glass bottle saves enough energy to light a 100-watt light bulb for four hours, power a computer for 30 minutes, or a television for 20 minutes.
  • It takes 24 trees to make one ton of uncoated virgin (non-recycled) printing and office paper.
  • Using recycled scrap paper instead of virgin material saves 7,000 gallons of water per ton of paper produced.
  • Recycled paper production creates 74 percent less air pollution and 35 percent less water pollution than virgin paper production.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or goes to a landfill, is a goal we can all work towards. 

Here are a few tips:

  • Buy products in bulk and bring your own reusable containers to store them in. This eliminates food waste by helping ensure you buy only what you need. This will become even more of an option in our area once the Prairie Roots Food Co-op has a physical store. If you’re not yet a member, visit http://prairie-roots.coop/ and join today!
  • Share or swap items with friends, family and neighbors to avoid unnecessary purchases.
  • Choose products and companies that support sustainability.
  • Focusing on quality over quantity.
  • Have items repaired instead of throwing them away.
  • Set aside unwanted, still-good items for schools, shelters and other organizations that will accept them.
  • Cook from scratch rather than buy packaged foods.
  • Reduce multiple trips to the store by stocking up on essential items, which will save gas and reduce pollution.
  • Avoid disposable items and instead use durable goods such as thermal cups, permanent plates and utensils.
  • Avoid taking freebies that you aren’t going to use.
  • Buy from thrift stores.
  • Before you purchase an item, consider what you’ll do with it’s no longer useful.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

MinnKota Recycling

MinnKota Recycling is a local company that specializes in multiple material recycling and brokerage services. Their business covers most of North Dakota and Minnesota. While operating five recycling facilities and over 600 commercial accounts in this region, MinnKota has been recognized as the “Best in North Dakota” by the State Department of Health. Major production mills have also recognized MinnKota across the U.S. for their quality materials.

MinnKota Recycling keeps all the materials they collect in the U.S., they don’t ship it out to other countries. For example, their #2 plastics go to Bedford Recycled Plastic Technology, a company in Worthington, MN that manufactures FiberForce Plastic Lumber out of it. Glass goes to Glass Advantage in West Fargo and they tumble it into landscaping rock and other products.

Tags: , , ,

eCycleBest is a website created by a team of electronic recyclers who have an immense love for new gadgets and electronics. They are a team of environmental activists who believe that gadgets and green thumbs can and should go hand in hand.

I was honored to recently be included as one of eCycleBest‘s Green Guardians. To read the full article, visit wendy-gabriel-mygreensidehttp://www.ecyclebest.com/blog/green-guardians/keeping-touch-green-side-green-living-mom-wendy-gabriel.

To read about other Green Guardians they’ve featured, visit http://www.ecyclebest.com/blog/green-guardians.

Tags: , , ,

EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM. WE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Become familar with your local recycling policies and prepare your recycling accordingly.MInnKota Recycling

When I was a recent transplant to the Fargo Moorhead area, I was surprised to discovered that nobody in our area recycled paperboard/boxboard (cereal boxes). Thankfully, that has changed and now we’re able to recycle paperboard in our curbside recycling. I think it’s important to always stay on top of what can and can’t be recycled through your area’s recycling programs.

City of Fargo offers free curbside recycling for residents along with 27 drop-off locations throughout Fargo for the collection of recyclables. Twelve of the sites have containers for all recyclables, including yard waste. accept aluminum cans and tin/metal cans. They cannot accept scrap metal, nails, tin foil, aerosol cans (if empty, throw out) or paint cans.

Here’s a look at what is allowable in the City of Fargo’s curbside recycling program:MInnKota Recycling

Cardboard: Corrugated cardboard boxes, brown kraft bags, beverage containers, shoe boxes, cereal and food boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

Plastics: #1-7 Clean plastic container such as soda bottles, milk containers, detergent and shampoo bottles, yogurt & cottage cheese containers, ice cream pails, margarine tubs and vegetable containers. All containers with a recycling symbol of 1-7. REMOVE THE PLASTIC LIDS BEFORE PLACING YOUR BOTTLES IN THE RECYCLING BIN.

The City of Fargo will not accept these plastics:

Styrofoam, beverage cups, trays or fast food containers. Motor oil or antifreeze bottles, plastic bags, shrink wrap, film, toys. These items are not accepted even if they contain a recycling symbol on them.

Newspapers and Magazines: Newspaper, shoppers and anything that is delivered in the newspaper, including glossy inserts. Magazines, small catalogs and similar printed material with glossy pages.

Aluminum and Tin Cans: Aluminum, steel and tin cans.

Glass: Clear, brown and green glass bottles and jars.

For more information about the City of Fargo’s recycling programs, visit http://www.cityoffargo.com/CityInfo/Departments/SolidWaste/Recycling/, for the City of West Fargo, visit http://www.westfargond.gov/ and for the City of Moorhead, visit http://www.ci.moorhead.mn.us/city_services/outside_garbage.asp.

RECYCLING FACTS from the National Resources Defense Council:

  • The U.S. currently recycles 32.5 percent of its waste, compared with about five percent in 1970.
  • According to the EPA, recycling cuts global warming pollution by the equivalent of removing 39.6 million passenger cars from the road.
  • Before 1973, no curbside recycling programs existed in the United States. By 2006, about 8,660 curbside programs had sprouted up across the nation.
  • Less than half of all post-consumer paper discarded in the United States is recovered for recycling.
  • Only 13 percent of water bottles are recycled. In 2005, Americans purchased 30 billion water bottles, and 26 billion of them wound up in landfills.
  • Airports and airlines recycle less than 20 percent of the 425,000 tons of passenger-related waste they produce each year.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or goes to a landfill, is a goal we can all work towards. 

Here are a few tips:

  • Buy products in bulk and bring your own reusable containers to store them in. This eliminates food waste by helping ensure you buy only what you need. This will become even more of an option in our area once the Prairie Roots Food Co-op has a physical store. If you’re not yet a member, visit http://prairie-roots.coop/ and join today!
  • Share or swap items with friends, family and neighbors to avoid unnecessary purchases.
  • Choose products and companies that support sustainability.
  • Focusing on quality over quantity.
  • Have items repaired instead of throwing them away.
  • Set aside unwanted, still-good items for schools, shelters and other organizations that will accept them.
  • Cook from scratch rather than buy packaged foods.
  • Reduce multiple trips to the store by stocking up on essential items, which will save gas and reduce pollution.
  • Avoid disposable items and instead use durable goods such as thermal cups, permanent plates and utensils.
  • Avoid taking freebies that you aren’t going to use.
  • Buy from thrift stores.
  • Before you purchase an item, consider what you’ll do with it’s no longer useful.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

MinnKota Recycling

MinnKota Recycling is a local company that specializes in multiple material recycling and brokerage services. Their business covers most of North Dakota and Minnesota. While operating five recycling facilities and over 600 commercial accounts in this region, MinnKota has been recognized as the “Best in North Dakota” by the State Department of Health. Major production mills have also recognized MinnKota across the U.S. for their quality materials.

MinnKota Recycling keeps all the materials they collect in the U.S., they don’t ship it out to other countries. For example, their #2 plastics go to Bedford Recycled Plastic Technology, a company in Worthington, MN that manufactures FiberForce Plastic Lumber out of it. Glass goes to Glass Advantage in West Fargo and they tumble it into landscaping rock and other products.

Tags: , , , , , ,

EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: America Recycles Day is November 15th. Take the time to review your city’s recycling guidelines and make sure you are doing all you can to keep recyclables out of your local landfill.

For more information about America Recycle’s Day, visit http://americarecyclesday.org/.

Here’s a look at what is allowable in the City of Fargo’s curbside recycling program:MInnKota Recycling

Cardboard: Corrugated cardboard boxes, brown kraft bags, beverage containers, shoe boxes cereal and food boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

Plastics: #1-7 Clean plastic container such as soda bottles, milk containers, detergent and shampoo bottles, yogurt & cottage cheese containers, ice cream pails, margarine tubs and vegetable containers. All containers with a recycling symbol of 1-7. REMOVE THE PLASTIC LIDS BEFORE PLACING YOUR BOTTLES IN THE RECYCLING BIN.

Newspapers and Magazines: Newspaper, shoppers and anything that is delivered in the newspaper, including glossy inserts. Magazines, small catalogs and similar printed material with glossy pages.

Aluminum and Tin Cans: Aluminum, steel and tin cans.

Glass: Clear, brown and green glass bottles and jars.

For more information about the City of Fargo’s recycling programs, visit http://www.cityoffargo.com/CityInfo/Departments/SolidWaste/Recycling/, for the City of West Fargo, visit http://www.westfargond.gov/ and for the City of Moorhead, visit http://www.ci.moorhead.mn.us/city_services/outside_garbage.asp.

RECYCLING FACTS from the National Resources Defense Council:

  • The U.S. currently recycles 32.5 percent of its waste, compared with about five percent in 1970.
  • According to the EPA, recycling cuts global warming pollution by the equivalent of removing 39.6 million passenger cars from the road.
  • Before 1973, no curbside recycling programs existed in the United States. By 2006, about 8,660 curbside programs had sprouted up across the nation.
  • Less than half of all post-consumer paper discarded in the United States is recovered for recycling.
  • Only 13 percent of water bottles are recycled. In 2005, Americans purchased 30 billion water bottles, and 26 billion of them wound up in landfills.
  • Airports and airlines recycle less than 20 percent of the 425,000 tons of passenger-related waste they produce each year.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or goes to a landfill, is a goal we can all work towards. 

Here are a few tips:

  • Buy products in bulk and bring your own reusable containers to store them in. This eliminates food waste by helping ensure you buy only what you need. This will become even more of an option in our area once the Prairie Roots Food Co-op has a physical store. If you’re not yet a member, visit http://prairie-roots.coop/ and join today!
  • Share or swap items with friends, family and neighbors to avoid unnecessary purchases.
  • Choose products and companies that support sustainability.
  • Focusing on quality over quantity.
  • Have items repaired instead of throwing them away.
  • Set aside unwanted, still-good items for schools, shelters and other organizations that will accept them.
  • Cook from scratch rather than buy packaged foods.
  • Reduce multiple trips to the store by stocking up on essential items, which will save gas and reduce pollution.
  • Avoid disposable items and instead use durable goods such as thermal cups, permanent plates and utensils.
  • Avoid taking freebies that you aren’t going to use.
  • Buy from thrift stores.
  • Before you purchase an item, consider what you’ll do with it’s no longer useful.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

MinnKota Recycling

MinnKota Recycling is a local company that specializes in multiple material recycling and brokerage services. Their business covers most of North Dakota and Minnesota. While operating five recycling facilities and over 600 commercial accounts in this region, MinnKota has been recognized as the “Best in North Dakota” by the State Department of Health. Major production mills have also recognized MinnKota across the U.S. for their quality materials.

MinnKota Recycling keeps all the materials they collect in the U.S., they don’t ship it out to other countries. For example, their #2 plastics go to Bedford Recycled Plastic Technology, a company in Worthington, MN that manufactures FiberForce Plastic Lumber out of it. Glass goes to Glass Advantage in West Fargo and they tumble it into landscaping rock and other products.

EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM. WE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Become familiar with your local recycling policies and prepare your recycling accordingly.Fargo Recycles

We haven’t talked about recycling in a while so I thought it was time to do a little recycling review. We have wonderful recycling programs in the Fargo Moorhead area. Of course, I’d love it if they’d allow office paper to be picked up curbside… but I digress…

Here’s a look at what is allowable in the City of Fargo’s curbside recycling program:

Fargo RecyclesCardboard: Corrugated cardboard boxes, brown kraft bags, beverage containers, shoe boxes cereal and food boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

Plastics: #1-7 Clean plastic container such as soda bottles, milk containers, detergent and shampoo bottles, yogurt & cottage cheese containers, ice cream pails, margarine tubs and vegetable containers. All containers with a recycling symbol of 1-7.

Newspapers and Magazines: Newspaper, shoppers and anything that is delivered in the newspaper, including glossy inserts. Magazines, small catalogs and similar printed material with glossy pages.

Aluminum and Tin Cans: Aluminum, steel and tin cans.

Glass: Clear, brown and green glass bottles and jars.

For more information about the City of Fargo’s recycling programs, visit http://www.cityoffargo.com/CityInfo/Departments/SolidWaste/Recycling/for the City of West Fargo, visit http://www.westfargond.gov/ and for the City of Moorhead, visit http://www.ci.moorhead.mn.us/city_services/outside_garbage.asp.

RECYCLING FACTS from the National Resources Defense Council:

  • The U.S. currently recycles 32.5 percent of its waste, compared with about five percent in 1970.
  • According to the EPA, recycling cuts global warming pollution by the equivalent of removing 39.6 million passenger cars from the road.
  • Before 1973, no curbside recycling programs existed in the United States. By 2006, about 8,660 curbside programs had sprouted up across the nation.
  • Less than half of all post-consumer paper discarded in the United States is recovered for recycling.
  • Only 13 percent of water bottles are recycled. In 2005, Americans purchased 30 billion water bottles, and 26 billion of them wound up in landfills.
  • Airports and airlines recycle less than 20 percent of the 425,000 tons of passenger-related waste they produce each year.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or goes to a landfill, is a goal we can all work towards. 

Here are a few tips:

  • Buy products in bulk and bring your own reusable containers to store them in. This eliminates food waste by helping ensure you buy only what you need. This will become even more of an option in our area once the Prairie Roots Food Co-op has a physical store. If you’re not yet a member, visit http://prairie-roots.coop/ and join today!
  • Share or swap items with friends, family and neighbors to avoid unnecessary purchases.
  • Choose products and companies that support sustainability.
  • Focusing on quality over quantity.
  • Have items repaired instead of throwing them away. 
  • Set aside unwanted, still-good items for schools, shelters and other organizations that will accept them.
  • Cook from scratch rather than buy packaged foods.
  • Reduce multiple trips to the store by stocking up on essential items, which will save gas and reduce pollution.
  • Avoid disposable items and instead use durable goods such as thermal cups, permanent plates and utensils.
  • Avoid taking freebies that you aren’t going to use.
  • Buy from thrift stores.
  • Before you purchase an item, consider what you’ll do with it’s no longer useful.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

1800Recycling.com

1800Recycling.com is a dynamic recycling and green living-focused website that makes recycling, conserving, reusing and living wisely easy.

The site also features a comprehensive recycling database that gives the user the ability to easily assemble a recycling to-do list. The database is location based to make your recycling needs as easy as possible whether you’re clearing out the house during spring cleaning or simply looking to recycle a few shopping bags.

To read more articles from Wendy about recycling, visit http://1800recycling.com/author/wendy-gabriel/.

Tags: , , , , ,

EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM. WE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Before you buy another plastic item, think about the long-term impacts. We consume billions of 5 Gyres Branded Klean Kanteenbags and bottle each year in the US alone and only 5% is being recovered for reuse. Look for alternatives to plastic like glass, metal and paper (from sustainable sources).

The short-term convenience of using and throwing away plastic products carries a very inconvenient long-term truth. These plastic water bottles, cups, utensils, electronics, toys, and gadgets we dispose of daily are rarely recycled in a closed loop. We currently recover only 5% of the plastics we produce. What happens to the rest of it? Roughly 50% is buried in landfills, some is remade into durable goods, and much of it remains “unaccounted for”, lost in the environment where it ultimately washes out to sea. Source: 5 Gyres

What can you do?

Baby steps: Collect your own plastic waste for one week, without judgment or guilt. At the end of the week, examine it as a scientist would. What does it say about your lifestyle? What kinds of things would be easiest to give up or replace? Plastic bags? Plastic bottles?

Learn a new mantra: Bring Your Own. Start with the easiest thing to remember. Is it a reusable water bottle? Reusable travel mug? Reusable grocery bags? Pick one thing that you will bring with you each time you go out and practice bringing it every time. Once that becomes a habit, add another reusable item.

Alternatives to plastic:CGProgram tote

  • Bring your own shopping bag to the grocery store, to the mall, to the thrift store – anywhere you would be getting a plastic bag to put your items in, bring your own instead.
  • Use your own stainless steel or glass bottle for your to go beverages.
  • Use paper, stainless steel or glass straws.
  • Bring your own produce bags to the grocery store or farmer’s market.
  • Choose milk in returnable glass bottles. Locally you can find milk and cream in returnable glass bottles at Sydney’s Health Market.

For more ideas and alternative to plastic, visit http://plasticfreeguide.com/.

Feeling inspired?

Zero Waste Week is coming up September 2nd to the 8th. Visit http://www.zerowasteweek.co.uk/ to find out moreZero Waste Week and pledge to reduce your landfill waste and save money at the same time!

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

5 Gyres

The 5 Gyres organization’s goal is to witness plastic pollution decline in the environment until it is no longer found in the world’s oceans. They work towards that goal by conducting research and communicating about the global impact of plastic pollution in the world’s oceans and employing strategies to eliminate the accumulation of plastic pollution in the 5 subtropical gyres.

To find out more about 5 Gyres and their goals, visit http://5gyres.org/who_we_are/mission/.

Gyre Facts from the Gyre Clean Up Project

  • A Gyre is a naturally occurring vortex of wind and currents that rotate in a clockwise direction in the northern hemisphere and counter-clockwise in the southern hemisphere. These create a whirlpool effect, whose vortex moves more slowly at the center and that is where marine plastic debris collects.
  • There are 5 major Gyres in the oceans worldwide, all of which are believed to contain plastic and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). These consist of carbon-containing chemical compounds that, to a varying degree, resist photochemical, biological and chemical degradation.
  • The North Pacific Gyre, also known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, is estimated to be twice the size of Texas and swirls in the Pacific Ocean roughly between the coast of California and Hawaii.
  • Currently, an estimated 11 million tons (and growing) of floating plastic covers an area of nearly 5 million square miles in the Pacific Ocean, 700 miles northeast of the Hawaiian Island chain and 1,000 miles from the coast of California.

Tags: , , , , ,

« Older entries