Thanksgiving

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. STARTING OCTOBER 13, 2014 A NEW TIME FOR THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM MEANS A NEW TIME FOR THIS SEGMENT… YOU CAN NOW STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 835AM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Try to plan a more sustainable Thanksgiving. Start by planning your meal based on local ingredients. Choosing a more sustainable way of eating supports your local farming community, is healthier and reduces your carbon footprint. 

Plan ahead for perfect portions and leftover packaging. At least 28 billion pounds of edible food is wasted each year – more than 100 pounds per person.

Use Less Stuff has 42 Ways to Watch Your Holiday Wasteline (pun intended). They’ve created a convenient list of approximate food portions for your Thanksgiving meal:

  • Turkey- 1 pound per person
  • Stuffing- ¼ pound per person
  • Sweet potato casserole- ¼ pound per person
  • Green beans- ¼ pound per person
  • Cranberry relish- 3 tablespoons per person
  • Pumpkin pie- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie per person

100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers MarketEnjoying Autumn

Locally, you can find a number of wonderful ingredients for your Thanksgiving meal and celebrate local foods at Concordia College in Moorhead. This year marks the 6th annual 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market at Concordia.

Where: the Atrium, Knutson Campus Center at Concordia College, 901 8th Street S., Moorhead MN 46462
When:  Tuesday, November 25th, 2014 at 3pm to 630pm

Each year more and more people celebrate a 100-Mile Thanksgiving by making their meal using only locally-produced food that is good for you and for the environment. The 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market will be an opportunity to fill your Thanksgiving table with products that are freshly harvested, locally sourced and sustainable.

The market is co-hosted with Prairie Roots Food Co-op. Their online market at https://www.localfoodmarketplace.com/prairieroots/ will be open to the public November 22nd – 24th, 2014 and pre-ordered items will be available for pickup at the 100-Mile Thanksgiving Market. Additionally, several vendors will have items for sale on site.

For more information, contact Dr. Gretchen Harvey at harvey@cord.edu.Prairie Roots Food Co-op volunteers

For more Thanksgiving ingredients and organic milk, meats and produce all year long, visit Sydney’s Health Market in Moorhead.

Talking turkey:

According to Sustainable Table, the traditional Thanksgiving turkey is different today than it was 50 years ago. Today, 99% of all turkeys raised in the U.S. are the “Broadbreasted White” variety (sometimes also referred to as the “Large White”).

These birds are raised in confinement in extremely crowded conditions on factory farms. They live in unnatural, uncomfortable conditions and are fed a steady diet of grain and supplements like antibiotics, rather than the grubs, bugs and grasses they should eat.

They are produced because of their large, white meaty breast. The breasts of these turkeys are so large that they are unable to reproduce naturally. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, without artificial insemination performed by humans, this variety of bird would become extinct in just one generation.

Industrial turkeys are often injected with saline solution and vegetable oils in an attempt to help improve the taste and texture of the meat. These factory farmed birds tend to be dry and tasteless, so cooks have developed a variety of methods to try to improve the taste. Turkeys are now marinated, brined, deep fried and covered with syrups, spices and herbs.

You have other options. You can order a heritage turkey, or you can look for organic and/or sustainable birds atLovely leaf pile butchers, specialty shops and at farmers markets around the country.

On to the leftovers:

You know you’re going to have them so make a plan. The Alternative Consumer has a wonderful suggestion in their green Thanksgiving guide.

Avoid plastic wrap. Most plastic wraps contain PVC which quickly winds up in landfills and has been linked to harmful environmental consequences. Use aluminum foil or, even better, send family home with glass or ceramic storage containers that they can return to you.

Or, call your guests and ask them to bring their own container if they’d like leftovers.

Above all, relax and enjoy your Thanksgiving, remember why we are celebrating.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Sustainable Table
Sustainable Table
 was launched in 2003 to educate consumers about issues surrounding the food supply. Sustainable Table celebrates sustainable food, educates consumers about food-related issues and works to build community through food.

Sustainable Table is also home to the Eat Well Guide, an online directory of sustainable products in the U.S. and Canada.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Try to plan a more sustainable Thanksgiving. Start by planning your meal based on local ingredients.Chef Cadence Choosing a more sustainable way of eating supports your local farming community, is healthier and reduces your carbon footprint. 

Plan ahead for perfect portions and leftover packaging. At least 28 billion pounds of edible food is wasted each year – more than 100 pounds per person.

Use Less Stuff has 42 Ways to Watch Your Holiday Wasteline (pun intended). They’ve created a convenient list of approximate food portions for your Thanksgiving meal:

  • Turkey- 1 pound per person
  • Stuffing- ¼ pound per person
  • Sweet potato casserole- ¼ pound per person
  • Green beans- ¼ pound per person
  • Cranberry relish- 3 tablespoons per person
  • Pumpkin pie- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie per person

Eat Local – Visit your local farmers’ market this Thanksgiving to pick up some locally grown produce as well as handcrafted goods. Think about what items are in season in your area and try to incorporate some of them into your Thanksgiving menu. And don’t forget to shop local for decorative and seasonal items such as gourds, pumpkins and other goodies to decorate your holiday table.

Locally, in the Fargo Moorhead area you can do this by visiting the 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market

100 Mile Thanksgiving

Student’s from Concordia’s capstone history course and members of the Prairie Roots Food Co-op invite you to attend: THE REAL ROOTS OF THANKSGIVING – Bringing neighbors together to celebrate the local harvest

This year marks the 5th annual 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market at Concordia.

Where: the Atrium, Knutson Campus Center at Concordia College
When:  Tuesday, November 26th, 2013 at 4pm to 7pm

For more information, visit http://prairie-roots.coop/?page_id=346

Prairie Roots Online will be open to the public to try out from Friday, November 22 through noon on Monday, November 25. Check out this easy and convenient way to get the best in local food. Pick up during this special promotional period will be at the 100-Mile Thanksgiving Market on Tuesday, November 26.

For more Thanksgiving ingredients and organic milk, meats and produce from a local store, visit Sydney’s Health Market in Moorhead.

Scrape Those Plates – The average American family wastes $600 in food each year. Instead of throwing away those uneaten leftovers or scraps, compost them instead. You can compost all sorts of organic materials and create rich soil that will make your garden grow and thrive.

Skip the Paper and Plastic – If you’re hosting a large group of people, it might be tempting to use paper plates and plastic cutlery. While this is considered a more convenient option, all that paper and plastic usually ends up in our nation’s landfills. Using glass or china plates and regular silverware is much better for the environment and if you have an Energy Star rated dishwasher, that makes it even better!

Carpool – If you’re traveling for the holiday, riding with several family members or taking public transportation will mean less carbon emissions than single-passenger vehicles.

Talking turkey:

According to Sustinable Table, the traditional Thanksgiving turkey is different today than it was 50 years ago. Today, 99% of all turkeys raised in the U.S. are the “Broadbreasted White” variety (sometimes also referred to as the “Large White”).

These birds are raised in confinement in extremely crowded conditions on factory farms. They live in unnatural, uncomfortable conditions and are fed a steady diet of grain and supplements like antibiotics, rather than the grubs, bugs and grasses they should eat.

They are produced because of their large, white meaty breast. The breasts of these turkeys are so large that they are unable to reproduce naturally. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, without artificial insemination performed by humans, this variety of bird would become extinct in just one generation.

Industrial turkeys are often injected with saline solution and vegetable oils in an attempt to help improve the taste and texture of the meat. These factory farmed birds tend to be dry and tasteless, so cooks have developed a variety of methods to try to improve the taste. Turkeys are now marinated, brined, deep fried and covered with syrups, spices and herbs.

You have other options. You can order a heritage turkey, or you can look for organic and/or sustainable birds at butchers, specialty shops and at farmers markets around the country.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Eat Wild

Eatwild.com is an excellent source for finding safe, healthy, natural and nutritious grass-fed beef, lamb, goats, bison, poultry, pork, dairy and other wild edibles.

The site provides:

Comprehensive, accurate information about the benefits of raising animals on pasture.

direct link to local farms that sell all-natural, delicious, grass-fed products.

Support for farmers who raise their livestock on pasture from birth to market and who actively promote the welfare of their animals and the health of the land.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Try to plan a more sustainable Thanksgiving. Start by planning your meal based on local ingredients. Choosing a more sustainable way of eating supports your local farming community, is healthier and reduces your carbon footprint. 

Plan ahead for perfect portions and leftover packaging. At least 28 billion pounds of edible food is wasted each year – more than 100 pounds per person.

Use Less Stuff has 42 Ways to Watch Your Holiday Wasteline (pun intended). They’ve created a convenient list of approximate food portions for your Thanksgiving meal:

  • Turkey- 1 pound per person
  • Stuffing- ¼ pound per person
  • Sweet potato casserole- ¼ pound per person
  • Green beans- ¼ pound per person
  • Cranberry relish- 3 tablespoons per person
  • Pumpkin pie- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie per person

100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market

Locally, you can find a number of wonderful ingredients for your Thanksgiving meal and celebrate local foods at Concordia College in Moorhead. This year marks the 4th annual 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market at Concordia.

Where: the Atrium, Knutson Campus Center at Concordia College
When:  Tuesday, November 20th, 2012 at 330pm to 7pm

For more information, visit http://www.cord.edu/About/sustainability/food1.php

For more Thanksgiving ingredients and organic milk, meats and produce all year long, visit Sydney’s Health Market in Moorhead.

Talking turkey:

According to Sustinable Table, the traditional Thanksgiving turkey is different today than it was 50 years ago. Today, 99% of all turkeys raised in the U.S. are the “Broadbreasted White” variety (sometimes also referred to as the “Large White”).

These birds are raised in confinement in extremely crowded conditions on factory farms. They live in unnatural, uncomfortable conditions and are fed a steady diet of grain and supplements like antibiotics, rather than the grubs, bugs and grasses they should eat.

They are produced because of their large, white meaty breast. The breasts of these turkeys are so large that they are unable to reproduce naturally. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, without artificial insemination performed by humans, this variety of bird would become extinct in just one generation.

Industrial turkeys are often injected with saline solution and vegetable oils in an attempt to help improve the taste and texture of the meat. These factory farmed birds tend to be dry and tasteless, so cooks have developed a variety of methods to try to improve the taste. Turkeys are now marinated, brined, deep fried and covered with syrups, spices and herbs.

You have other options. You can order a heritage turkey, or you can look for organic and/or sustainable birds at butchers, specialty shops and at farmers markets around the country.

On to the leftovers:

You know you’re going to have them so make a plan. The Alternative Consumer has a wonderful suggestion in their green Thanksgiving guide.

Avoid plastic wrap. Most plastic wraps contain PVC which quickly winds up in landfills and has been linked to harmful environmental consequences. Use aluminum foil or, even better, send family home with glass or ceramic storage containers that they can return to you.

Or, call your guests and ask them to bring their own container if they’d like leftovers.

Above all, take time to enjoy the day!

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Eat Wild

Eatwild.com is an excellent source for finding safe, healthy, natural and nutritious grass-fed beef, lamb, goats, bison, poultry, pork, dairy and other wild edibles.

The site provides:

Comprehensive, accurate information about the benefits of raising animals on pasture.

A direct link to local farms that sell all-natural, delicious, grass-fed products.

Support for farmers who raise their livestock on pasture from birth to market and who actively promote the welfare of their animals and the health of the land.

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Editor’s Note: Each Tuesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living toThe Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Tuesday at WDAY.com or, if you’re in North Dakota or western Minnesota, listen on your radio at AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Try to plan a more sustainable Thanksgiving. Start by planning your meal based on local ingredients. Choosing a more sustainable way of eating supports your local farming community, is healthier and reduces your carbon footprint. 

Plan ahead for perfect portions and leftover packaging. At least 28 billion pounds of edible food is wasted each year – more than 100 pounds per person.

Use Less Stuff has 42 Ways to Watch Your Holiday Wasteline (pun intended). They’ve created a convenient list of approximate food portions for your Thanksgiving meal:

  • Turkey- 1 pound per person
  • Stuffing- ¼ pound per person
  • Sweet potato casserole- ¼ pound per person
  • Green beans- ¼ pound per person
  • Cranberry relish- 3 tablespoons per person
  • Pumpkin pie- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie per person

100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market

Locally, you can find a number of wonderful ingredients for your Thanksgiving meal and celebrate local foods at Concordia College in Moorhead. This year marks the 3rd annual 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market at Concordia.

Where: the Atrium, Knutson Campus Center at Concordia College
When:  Thursday, November 17th, 2011 at 330pm to 630pm

Some of the farmers and producers of the fresh, local and seasonal foods:

There will also be some fun activities for kids of all ages. For more information, contact Dr. Gretchen Harvey at harvey@cord.edu.

For more Thanksgiving ingredients and organic milk, meats and produce all year long, visit Sydney’s Health Market in Moorhead.

Talking turkey:

According to Sustinable Table, the traditional Thanksgiving turkey is different today than it was 50 years ago. Today, 99% of all turkeys raised in the U.S. are the “Broadbreasted White” variety (sometimes also referred to as the “Large White”).

These birds are raised in confinement in extremely crowded conditions on factory farms. They live in unnatural, uncomfortable conditions and are fed a steady diet of grain and supplements like antibiotics, rather than the grubs, bugs and grasses they should eat.

They are produced because of their large, white meaty breast. The breasts of these turkeys are so large that they are unable to reproduce naturally. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, without artificial insemination performed by humans, this variety of bird would become extinct in just one generation.

Industrial turkeys are often injected with saline solution and vegetable oils in an attempt to help improve the taste and texture of the meat. These factory farmed birds tend to be dry and tasteless, so cooks have developed a variety of methods to try to improve the taste. Turkeys are now marinated, brined, deep fried and covered with syrups, spices and herbs.

You have other options. You can order a heritage turkey, or you can look for organic and/or sustainable birds at butchers, specialty shops and at farmers markets around the country.

On to the leftovers:

You know you’re going to have them so make a plan. The Alternative Consumer has a wonderful suggestion in their green Thanksgiving guide.

Avoid plastic wrap. Most plastic wraps contain PVC which quickly winds up in landfills and has been linked to harmful environmental consequences. Use aluminum foil or, even better, send family home with glass or ceramic storage containers that they can return to you.

Or, call your guests and ask them to bring their own container if they’d like leftovers.

Above all, relax and enjoy your Thanksgiving, remember why we are celebrating.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Sustainable Table
Sustainable Table
was launched in 2003 to educate consumers about issues surrounding the food supply and to encourage individuals to switch to healthier, more sustainable eating habits.

Sustainable Table is also home to the Eat Well Guide, an online directory of sustainable products in the U.S. and Canada.

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Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Wednesday at WDAY.com.

GREEN TIP: Driving and maintaining your vehicle properly can increase your vehicle’s fuel efficiency and decrease your gas costs. Keep this in mind as you plan your Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday road trips.

Our friends at Traveling Greener have put together some ways to practice more fuel-efficient driving, creating less pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, just in time for the holidays.

Planning your trip:

  • Get a customized map with low gas prices along the route. Because getting lost while driving in unfamiliar areas could lead to an expensive waste of gas.
    • FuelEconomy.gov provides fuel economy estimates, energy and environmental impact ratings, fuel-saving tips, and other useful information.
    • GasBuddy.com is a network of more than 200 website designed to help you find the lowest gasoline prices
    • MapQuest: Gas Prices includes maps of gas locations.
  • Choose the right vehicle. If your family has more than one vehicle, drive the car that gets better gas mileage.
  • Drive during off-peak hours to reduce gas costs and stress by avoiding stop-and-go or bumper-to-bumper traffic conditions.
  • Investigate other travel options. Consider trains, buses, or public transportation to your destination.
  • Explore new ways to get around at your destination. Find information on biking, public transportation routes, car sharing, walking, and renting hybrid or fuel-efficient vehicles.

Preparing your vehicle:

  • Inflate your tires. Keeping your tires properly inflated improves gas mileage by around 3%.
  • Select the right oil. Using the manufacturer’s recommended grade of motor oil improves gas mileage by 1 to 2%. Motor oil that says “Energy Conserving” on the API performance symbol contains friction-reducing additives. Change your oil as recommended to extend the life of your vehicle.
    • If you’re changing your own oil make sure you dispose of your used motor oil responsibly. Used oil from a single oil change can ruin a million gallons of fresh water, a year’s supply for 50 people. Take your used motor oil to a used oil collection site (UOCS) that accepts and recycles used motor oil. In the US call 1-800-CLEANUP and in Canada call 1-800-667-4321 for the nearest used oil disposal facility. Source: Eartheasy.com
  • Tune up. Fixing a car that is noticeably out of tune or has failed an emissions test can improve its gas mileage by an average of 4%.

On the road: Driving Tips

  • Decrease your speed. Gas mileage usually decreases rapidly above 60 mph. Each five miles per hour over 60 mph is like paying an additional 24 cents or more per gallon for gas.
  • Drive sensibly. Speeding, rapid acceleration (jackrabbit starts), and rapid braking can lower gas mileage by up to 33% at highway speeds and up to 5% in town.
  • Use cruise control and overdrive gear. Cruise control cuts fuel consumption by maintaining a steady speed during highway driving. Overdrive gear, when appropriate, reduces engine speed, saves gas, and reduces engine wear.
  • Avoid carrying items on your vehicle’s roof. A loaded roof rack or carrier increases weight and aerodynamic drag, which can cut mileage by 5%. Place items inside the trunk when possible to improve fuel economy.
  • Avoid idling, which gets 0 mpg. Cars with larger engines typically waste even more gas while idling than cars with smaller engines.
  • Fill up before returning a rental car. Rental car companies charge higher gas prices if you don’t fill up the tank before returning the vehicle. Also save your gas receipts as proof.

For more money saving tips and resources, go to DriveSmarterChallenge.org.

The less gasoline used, the less money we pay, the less pollution we create, and the more we protect our planet.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Eartheasy.com
Eartheasy provides solutions for sustainable living. They are a family business with an incredible story. They believe that the values of a simpler, less-consumptive lifestyle, with respect for nature, can benefit anyone in any setting – urban, suburban or rural. They want to get us thinking about what constitutes true wealth in your life, and the implications our lifestyle and consumer choices have on the environment.

Sustainable living is about respecting the limits of the earth’s capacity to provide. ~Greg Seaman, founder of Eartheasy.com

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Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Wednesday at WDAY.com. NOTE: SIMPLE TIPS WILL AIR ON TUESDAYS BEGINNING OCTOBER 25 2011.

GREEN TIP: Try to plan a more sustainable Thanksgiving. Plan ahead for perfect portions and leftover packaging. At least 28 billion pounds of edible food is wasted each year – more than 100 pounds per person.

Use Less Stuff has 42 Ways to Watch Your Holiday Wasteline (pun intended). They’ve created a convenient list of approximate food portions for your Thanksgiving meal:

  • Turkey- 1 pound per person
  • Stuffing- ¼ pound per person
  • Sweet potato casserole- ¼ pound per person
  • Green beans- ¼ pound per person
  • Cranberry relish- 3 tablespoons per person
  • Pumpkin pie- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie per person

Locally, you can find a number of wonderful ingredients for your Thanksgiving meal at Sydney’s Health Market. If you not been there yet, head over this Saturday, November 13th 2010 for their Healthy Holidays Celebration from 10am to 3pm. Sign up for door prizes, samples some treats and soak in their warm and welcoming atmosphere.

Go to Sydney’s Health Market’s website for more information.

Talking turkey:

According to Sustinable Table, the traditional Thanksgiving turkey is different today than it was 50 years ago. Today, 99% of all turkeys raised in the U.S. are the “Broadbreasted White” variety (sometimes also referred to as the “Large White”).

These birds are raised in confinement in extremely crowded conditions on factory farms. They live in unnatural, uncomfortable conditions and are fed a steady diet of grain and supplements like antibiotics, rather than the grubs, bugs and grasses they should eat.

They are produced because of their large, white meaty breast. The breasts of these turkeys are so large that they are unable to reproduce naturally. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, without artificial insemination performed by humans, this variety of bird would become extinct in just one generation.

Industrial turkeys are often injected with saline solution and vegetable oils in an attempt to help improve the taste and texture of the meat. These factory farmed birds tend to be dry and tasteless, so cooks have developed a variety of methods to try to improve the taste. Turkeys are now marinated, brined, deep fried and covered with syrups, spices and herbs.

You have other options. You can order a heritage turkey, or you can look for organic and/or sustainable birds at butchers, specialty shops and at farmers markets around the country.

Locally: Pre-order your turkey at Sydney’s Health Market. They have local, free-range, organic birds available for $2.99 per pound. Head on over to 810 30th Ave S in Moorhead or give them a call at 218-233-3310.

On to the leftovers:

You know you’re going to have them so make a plan. The Alternative Consumer has a wonderful suggestion in their green Thanksgiving guide.

Avoid plastic wrap. Most plastic wraps contain PVC which quickly winds up in landfills and has been linked to harmful environmental consequences. Use aluminum foil or, even better, send family home with glass or ceramic storage containers that they can return to you.

Or, call your guests and ask them to bring their own container if they’d like leftovers.

Above all, relax and enjoy your Thanksgiving, remember why we are celebrating.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Sustainable Table
Sustainable Table
was launched in 2003 to educate consumers about issues surrounding the food supply and to encourage individuals to switch to healthier, more sustainable eating habits.

Sustainable Table is also home to the Eat Well Guide, an online directory of sustainable products in the U.S. and Canada.

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by Wendy Gabriel

For flowers that bloom about our feet;Beautiful blooms
For tender grass, so fresh, so sweet;
For song of bird, and hum of bee;
For all things fair we hear or see,
Father in heaven, we thank Thee!
~Ralph Waldo Emerson

I am a self-professed twitter addict. Through twitter I have met many amazing people; some of them have become really good friends. I’m thankful for their insights and information.

I really wanted to find out some things that people are thankful for this year so I asked the twitterverse:

@alisonkerr: Clean water, good food, open spaces & choices. All of these I hv in Kansas – many in the world live w/out. Im very fortunate. Im thankful.
Alison Kerr is the

@balmeras: Employment & Friends! and chocolate.

@bcrcoffee: To serve others and to contribute to much more relevant 21st Century causes such as human life and the natural world around us.

@CB4wildlife: Thankful for loving support of friends & family, good health, birds & other wildlife whose presence in my garden provides me w/ such cheer.

@CGProgram: Im thankful for my amazing family, good health and the incredible opportunity given to me by 970 WDAY to host a daily talk show my own way.

@DianeMacEachern: I am thankful for my wonderful family & friends; our good health; & our simple lives.

@familyonbikes: I’m thankful that I have this opportunity to bike the world with my children. Family adventure is great!

@greenbungalows: I am thankful that social media allows so many like-minded peeps to learn about the interesting and good work of others!

@GRPreserve: Grateful for not only having a job, but having one that I truly enjoy… also very thankful for my family and friends

@MommyMellie: This year I am most thankful for my family’s good health and my husband’s new job.

@MyGreenSide: Im thankful for my loving husband, my precious little girls, my family and friends! I am blessed! 🙂

@rshreeves: Hmmm.. I am thankful for my family, my friends, a job that I love, and a warm kitchen with good smells coming from it.

@YourWildChild: Thankful for snow, sledding, skiing and playing outside!

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by Wendy Gabriel

GREEN TIP: Try to plan a more sustainable Thanksgiving. Plan ahead for perfect portions andYou are what you eat! plan out leftover packaging. At least 28 billion pounds of edible food is wasted each year – more than 100 pounds per person.

Use Less Stuff gives us 42 Ways to Watch Your Holiday Wasteline (pun intended). They’ve created a convenient list of approximate food portions for your Thanksgiving meal:

  • Turkey- 1 pound per person
  • Stuffing- ¼ pound per person
  • Sweet potato casserole- ¼ pound per person
  • Green beans- ¼ pound per person
  • Cranberry relish- 3 tablespoons per person
  • Pumpkin pie- 1/8 of a 9 inch pie per person

On to the leftovers:

You know you’re going to have them so make a plan. The Alternative Consumer has a wonderful suggestion in their green Thanksgiving guide.

Avoid plastic wrap. Most plastic wraps contain PVC which quickly winds up in landfills and has been linked to harmful environmental consequences. Use aluminum foil or, even better, send family home with glass or ceramic storage containers that they can return to you.

Or, call your guests and ask them to bring their own container if they’d like leftovers.

Above all, relax and enjoy your Thanksgiving, remember why we are celebrating.

Who does not thank for little will not thank for much. ~Estonian proverb

My Green Side’s weekly web pick:

Mother Earth News
Mother Earth News: the original guide to living wisely. The online presence of this magazine is filled with great information and how-to guides including Sustainable Thanksgiving Meals and Recipes.

Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1020am (CDT) every Wednesday at WDAY.com.

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by Wendy Gabriel

Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The The PumpkinChristopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a different favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1020am (CDT) every Wednesday at WDAY.com.

GREEN TIP: Make your Thanksgiving a little greener this year. Whether you’re hosting a Thanksgiving dinner or traveling to celebrate the holiday, there are many things you can do to have a greener Thanksgiving.

  • If you’re cooking, try to find ingredients that were grown locally. Do your shopping at farmers markets or your local co-op. To find out where they are, look in your local newspaper or search the Eat Well Guide.
  • For food you buy from the grocery store, choose items with minimal packaging. And be sure to bring your own bags with you.
  • Serving turkey? Choose an organic bird.
  • Provide cloth napkins and reusable dishware and utensils. You won’t be sending napkins, plastic plates and cups to a landfill and you’ll save money.
  • Adjust the thermostat down a couple of degrees. All that cooking and the body heat from your guests will surely compensate. You’ll save energy and that will save you money.
  • Compost all the waste you can.
  • If you’re traveling to enjoy dinner at someone else’s house, carpool with family or friends. And of course if you’re bringing food, follow the tips above and pack your dish in a reusable container.
  • Remember to give thanks.

Source: Smithsonian National Zoological Park

BONUS TIP: If you have any leftover turkey, try this awesome Turkey Pot Pie Recipe from Robin Shreeves at A Little Greener Every Day.

My Green Side’s weekly website pick:

Local Harvest

Use the Local Harvest website to find farmers’ markets, family farms, and other sources of sustainably grown food in your area.

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By Wendy Gabriel

GREEN TIP:  Reduce your energy consumption during the holidays.  The result will be a reduction in your energy costs, a lowering of your greenhouse gas emissions and, most importantly, an increase in your face-to-face family time.

As a mother of two little girls, it is sometimes a temptation to put the kids in front of the TV with the VeggieTales while we’re preparing to entertain.  Shocking, I know.  But we have made a pact this year to get our children involved with every part of our holiday preparations.  Who cares if your windows aren’t sparkling and the cranberries aren’t relished to perfection when your whole family is involved and embracing the celebration. 

Give your kids age-appropriate tasks to feel a part of the preparations:  Helping with the food prep, setting the table, making name cards and paper napkin rings or mixing up some homemade play dough to occupy little ones who may not be old enough to help julienne the veggies.

This homemade play dough recipe from The Green Parent is excellent! 

Ingredients:

1 cup organic flour

½ cup sea salt

2 Tbs. cream of tartar

1 cup filtered water

1 Tbs. vegetable oil

Mix flour, salt and cream of tartar in a saucepan.  Combine water and oil in a small bowl.  Stir into flour mixture gradually.  Cook over medium heat for 5 minutes or until very thick, stirring constantly.  Remove and allow to cool for a few minutes.  Knead until smooth.  Store in an airtight container.

We use a few drops of essential oils to make our creations smell fantastic; usually lavender because it also promotes stress-free play time.  And we color our dough by writing on it with some non-toxic markers and then kneading in the color.

The holiday season is a time for family, friends and giving thanks so unplug the TV, DVD player, gaming systems and computers.  Save some energy and enjoy the holidays. 

Be Well.  Be Green.  Have a safe and blessed Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas and all other holidays I’m either unaware of or have neglected to mention.

 

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