Green Tip – Reduce Cell Phone Exposure

EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM. WE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Use simple precautions to protect yourself from cell phone radiation like limiting phone use, Talking on the phone... old schoolmaking sure you use a headset or speaker, don’t keep phones close to your body and text more than you talk.

We’ve talked before about New Concerns About Cell Phone Radiation and discussed how recent studies show children and small adults absorb significantly more cell phone radiation than had been previously thought.

Download Summary PDF “Exposure Limits: The underestimation of absorbed cell phone radiation, especially in children” by Om P. Gandhi, L. Lloyd Morgan, Alvaro Augusto de Salles,Yueh-Ying Han, Ronald B. Herberman & Devra Lee Davis (Corresponding author is L. Lloyd Morgan at 510-841-4362 or Lloyd.L.Morgan@gmail.com)

The last time the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) set a legal maximum on cell phone radiation was back in 1996 well before cell phones became mainstream. The “it” cell phone at that time was Motorola’s StarTac. It retailed for $2,000, it’s battery maxed out at 3 hours and it had an early adaptation of texting available on it.

Sixteen years later, cell phones — with 6 billion subscriptions worldwide and counting — have revolutionized how we communicate. The technology that powers them has changed just as dramatically. Today’s smartphones vibrate, rock out, show high-def movies, make photos and videos, issue voice commands, check email, go underwater, navigate with global positioning systems and surf the web in 3-D. They sport dual core processors and batteries that let you – or your kid — talk for close to 20 hours.

Yet those 16-year-old FCC rules still stand. Are they up to the job of protecting the public from radiation coming out of those multi-tasking marvels and the networks that enable them? Source: www.EWG.org

Hmmm…

Here are some tips from the Environmental Working Group for reducing cell phone exposure:

1. LIMIT CHILDREN’S PHONE USE

Young children’s brains absorb twice as much cell phone radiation as those of adults. EWG joins health agencies in at least 6 countries in recommending limits for children’s phone use, such as for emergency situations only.

2. Use a headset or speaker

Headsets emit much less radiation than phones. Some wireless headsets emit continuous, low-level radiation, so take yours off your ear when you’re not on a call. Using your phone in speaker mode also reduces radiation to the head.

3. Listen more, talk less

Your phone emits radiation when you talk or text, but not when you’re receiving messages. Listening more and talking less reduces your exposures.

4. Hold phone away from your body

Hold the phone away from your torso when you’re talking (with headset or speaker), not against your ear, in a pocket, or on your belt where soft body tissues absorb radiation.

5. Choose texting over talking

Phones use less power (less radiation) to send text than voice. And unlike when you speak with the phone at your ear, texting keeps radiation away from your head.

6. Stay off the phone if your signal is poor

Fewer signal bars on your phone means that it emits more radiation to get the signal to the tower. Make and take calls when your phone has a strong signal.

7. Don’t use a “radiation shield”

Radiation shields such as antenna caps or keypad covers reduce the connection quality and force the phone to transmit at a higher power with higher radiation.

Remember to recycle your spent cell phone battery and used cell phone. Visit 1800Recycling.com to find a 1800recyclingreputable electronics recyclers in your area.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Environmental Working Group

The Environmental Working Group is the nation’s leading environmental health research and advocacy organization. Their mission is to serve as a watchdog to see that Americans get straight facts, unfiltered and unspun, so they can make healthier choices and enjoy a cleaner environment. Check out their Consumer Guides on everything from bottled water to pesticides in produce. Visit the Environmental Working Group at http://www.ewg.org/ to learn more.

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