1800Recycling.com

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It’s been waaay too long since my last post! My life has been turned upside down and I’m still trying to catch my breath.

So here’s a quick update:

Right before Christmas 2014, Christopher (husband of My Green Side) was flown to California for a job interview with a radio station in a market significantly higher than the Fargo radio market. They loved him and, while we were in Wisconsin at my family’s farm for Christmas, the negotiations began.

One of my favorite ornaments. Made by Missy

Christmas 2014

It became very clear, very quickly that the Gabriel Family was going to be making a move. Soon the contract was signed, family and friends were told and arrangements were made. If I missed sending a personal note to anyone, I apologize! In my defense, it was a whirlwind trying to get everything done and moved. I wanted to make sure the girls saw everyone they wanted to see before we left so I am beyond thankful that we were able to spend time with a lot of our extended family during Christmas. And, frankly, I’m still getting used to the idea that we’re actually living in California!

CG studio shot

Christopher’s last day on the air at WDAY AM 970 and the girls last day of school in Fargo was January 9th. We then commenced saying goodbyes to dear friends, neighbors, our favorite babysitter, classmates, teachers, doctors… I have tears in my eyes now as I remember all the people I love and miss in that part of the world.

The Hotel Donaldson, Fargo

The moving truck arrived and, on January 16th, we were on our way from Fargo to Fresno. We drove the 2,000 miles to give the girls a chance to see parts of our beautiful country that they had never seen before. The weather was incredible and our mini-vacation was so much fun. Seeing sights like the Rocky Mountains through their eyes is an experience I will always treasure.

Fargo to Fresno mug

Fargo to Fresno mug in NebraskaA frozen waterfall in the Rocky Mountains

 

 

 

On January 22nd, Christopher was on air for the first broadcast of The Christopher Gabriel Program in Fresno, California. On the following Monday the girls started at their new school. The people at their school are lovely and as an added bonus, we are close enough to walk.

Since we’ve been in California, we’ve made multiple trips to the Sierra Nevada’s and Shaver Lake, Monterey and Carmel, Yosemite, Disneyland and gorgeous areas within our own community. We feel extremely blessed to be here and hope to be a positive addition to this area.

Carmel-by-the-Sea

Words can’t express how proud I am of Christopher and how he manages to bring his intelligence, sense of humor and humanity to his program each and every day. I hope that talk radio everywhere looks at his model and learns that anyone can scream and yell but it takes a real professional to let everyone be heard with respect and civility. We will never get anything worthwhile done in our homes, in our school or in our government unless we learn to really listen to each other and be respectful no matter which side of an issue you are on. Didn’t we all learn to treat each other the way we want to be treated?

I continue to write for 1800Recycling.com but will not be on Christopher’s program for a Simple Tips for Green Living segment (at least not until we’re all completely settled into our new normal). I am excited to discover what God has in store for this new chapter in my life.

Our neighbor's palm tree

Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it ~Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Become familiar with your local recycling policies and prepare your recycling accordingly.

We’ve had some exciting recycling news this week. On July 1st, the Cities of Fargo and Moorhead expanded their recycling programs to accept paperboard and more types of plastic.

Instead of just accepting corrugated cardboard residents of both cities can now include cereal boxes, milk and juice cartons, shoe boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

From the City of Fargo:

Acceptable cardboard: Corrugated cardboard boxes, brown kraft bags, beverage containers, shoe boxes cereal and food boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

Unacceptable cardboard: Waxed boxes or boxes that come from refrigerator or the freezer.

Preparation required: Large boxes should be flattened and placed under container. Please slit seams on smaller boxes and flatten.

Also, instead of only accepting plastic containers with the “resin identification code,” or RIC inside the chasing arrow symbol of 1 or 2, they will now be accepting the RIC of 1 through 7.

From the City of Fargo:

Acceptable plastics: #1-7 Clean plastic containers such as soda bottles, milk containers, detergent and shampoo bottles, yogurt & cottage cheese containers, ice cream pails, margarine tubs and vegetable containers. All containers with a recycling symbol of 1-7.

Unacceptable plastics: Styrofoam, beverage cups, trays or fast food containers. Motor oil or antifreeze bottles, plastic bags, shrink wrap, film, toys.

Preparation required: Please rinse all containers and remove caps and lids. Place plastic in a brown paper bag.

For more information, visit http://www.cityoffargo.com/CityInfo/Departments/SolidWaste/Recycling/.

RECYCLING FACTS from the National Resources Defense Council:

  • The U.S. currently recycles 32.5 percent of its waste, compared with about five percent in 1970.
  • According to the EPA, recycling cuts global warming pollution by the equivalent of removing 39.6 million passenger cars from the road.
  • Before 1973, no curbside recycling programs existed in the United States. By 2006, about 8,660 curbside programs had sprouted up across the nation.
  • Less than half of all post-consumer paper discarded in the United States is recovered for recycling.
  • Only 13 percent of water bottles are recycled. In 2005, Americans purchased 30 billion water bottles, and 26 billion of them wound up in landfills.
  • Airports and airlines recycle less than 20 percent of the 425,000 tons of passenger-related waste they produce each year.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or landfill, is a goal we all work towards. What are some ways you reduce your waste?

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

1800Recycling.com
1800Recycling.com is a dynamic recycling and green living-focused website that makes recycling, conserving, reusing and living wisely easy.

The site also features a comprehensive recycling database that gives the user the ability to easily assemble a recycling to-do list. The database is location based to make your recycling needs as easy as possible whether you’re clearing out the house during spring cleaning or simply looking to recycle a few shopping bags.

To read more articles from Wendy about recycling, visit http://1800recycling.com/author/wendy-gabriel/.

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Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Wednesday at WDAY.com or, if you’re in North Dakota or western Minnesota, listen on your radio at AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Use simple precautions like using a headset to avoid needless exposure to cell phone radiation.

According to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), recent studies suggest that cell phones may cause health problems. The government has been lax in evaluating the rapidly developing science and slow to reexamine the radiation limits. Current cell phone radiation standards were adopted by the FCC from 1992 recommendations issued by industry (the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, or IEEE). These standards allow 20 times more radiation to penetrate the head compared to the rest of the body, do not account for risks to children, and fail to consider the recent research findings on health risks. The FCC should close these gaps and ensure that cell phone radiation standards protect children and others who are most vulnerable.

Source: Environmental Working Group

Cell phones emit low-frequency electromagnetic radiation—not strong enough to change the structure of atoms but possibly strong enough to heat tissue, according to the CDC. The amount of radiation that is emitted by a phone and then absorbed by nearby human tissue—namely, your face, ear, and skull—is called the SAR (specific absorption rate). This number can be different for two people using the same phone because it depends on a user’s body weight. Children typically absorb more than adults.

According to Dr. Michael Thun, vice president emeritus of epidemiology and surveillance research at the American Cancer Society,

If cell phones were harmful, then it is conceivable that children might be more vulnerable.  A child’s nervous system is still developing, and beginning cellphone use early in life can increase the duration of exposure.

Here are some tips from the EWG for reducing your exposure:

1. LIMIT CHILDREN’S PHONE USE

Young children’s brains absorb twice as much cell phone radiation as those of adults. EWG joins health agencies in at least 6 countries in recommending limits for children’s phone use, such as for emergency situations only.

2. Buy a low-radiation phone

The EWG has put together a buyer’s guide of all cell phones based on the amount of radiation they emit. Visit http://www.ewg.org/cellphoneradiation/Get-a-Safer-Phone and see if you cell phone is on the best or worst list.

3. Use a headset or speaker

Headsets emit much less radiation than phones. Some wireless headsets emit continuous, low-level radiation, so take yours off your ear when you’re not on a call. Using your phone in speaker mode also reduces radiation to the head.

4. Listen more, talk less

Your phone emits radiation when you talk or text, but not when you’re receiving messages. Listening more and talking less reduces your exposures.

5. Hold phone away from your body

Hold the phone away from your torso when you’re talking (with headset or speaker), not against your ear, in a pocket, or on your belt where soft body tissues absorb radiation.

6. Choose texting over talking

Phones use less power (less radiation) to send text than voice. And unlike when you speak with the phone at your ear, texting keeps radiation away from your head.

7. Stay off the phone if your signal is poor

Fewer signal bars on your phone means that it emits more radiation to get the signal to the tower. Make and take calls when your phone has a strong signal.

8. Don’t use a “radiation shield”

Radiation shields such as antenna caps or keypad covers reduce the connection quality and force the phone to transmit at a higher power with higher radiation.

Remember to recycle your spent cell phone battery and used cell phone. Visit 1800Recycling.com to find a reputable electronics recyclers in your area.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Slow Food USA
Slow Food USA seeks to create dramatic and lasting change in the food system. They endeavor to reconnect Americans with the people, traditions, plants, animals, fertile soils and waters that produce our food. They seek to inspire a transformation in food policy, production practices and market forces so that they ensure equity, sustainability and pleasure in the food we eat.

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Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Wednesday at WDAY.com or, if you’re in North Dakota or western Minnesota, listen on your radio at AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Become familiar with your local recycling policies and prepare your recycling accordingly.

As a recent transplant to the Fargo Moorhead area, I was surprised to discovered that nobody in our area recycles paperboard/boxboard (cereal boxes) so I decided I needed to take a look at what we can recycle.

Not everything can be recycled, but you should be able to find recycling facilities for these six main categories of household waste:

  • Paper
  • Plastics
  • Glass
  • Metals
  • Organics
  • Textiles

The City of Fargo offers free curbside recycling for residents along with 26 drop-off locations throughout Fargo for the collection of recyclables. Twelve of the sites have containers for all recyclables, including yard waste. They accept aluminum cans and tin/metal cans. They cannot accept scrap metal, nails, tin foil, aerosol cans (if empty, throw out) or paint cans.

Cans, glass and plastic

They accept clear, brown and green glass bottles and jars. Blue glass containers can be placed with green glass. Labels do not need to be removed, however, please remove caps. We cannot accept ceramics, window glass, Pyrex, or standard light bulbs (fluorescent bulbs should be brought to the Household Hazardous Waste facility.)

They accept plastic bottles with a neck that have the #1 or #2 recycling symbol. Please empty, rinse and remove caps and rings before recycling. They cannot accept plastic containers #3 or higher, plastic bags, motor oil containers or vegetable oil bottles.

Corrugated cardboard

They accept corrugated cardboard boxes (with the wavy edge) and brown paper bags. Examples include mailing/shipping boxes, clean pizza box tops and some beverage boxes (most are not corrugated so check to be sure!).

They cannot accept used pizza boxes, wax-coated cardboard, soda cases, or boxboard (non-corrugated boxes such as cereal, shoe, and cigarette-type boxes).

Magazines and newspapers

They accept magazines and small catalogs with glossy pages.

They cannot accept catalogs with glued bindings, such as those from department stores or phone books (these are recycled in a special, short-term collection held each year).

We accept newspapers and shoppers (i.e. the Midweek) including their glossy inserts.

Source: City of Fargo

Shampoo/conditioner bottle caps

Aveda has a bottle cap recycling program. Bring your hard plastic caps to Aveda and they will use it to make new ones.

Plastic bags

We’ve talked about plastic bags in a previous Green Tip, Green Tip – Bring Your Own Bag. If you happen to find yourself with one, you can recycle it at most area grocery stores. Hornbacher’s, for example, has a plastic bag recycling bin as you enter the grocery store.

Getting back to those cereal boxes. I was initially frustrated that our area doesn’t recycle them but now I’m looking at it as an opportunity to reduce more waste. I’m going to buy bulk ingredients (in my own containers) and make my own granola.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or landfill, is a goal we all work towards. What are some ways you reduce your waste?

My Green Side’s web pick of the week

1800Recycling.com
1800Recycling.com is a dynamic recycling and green living-focused website that makes recycling, conserving, reusing and living wisely easy.

The site also features a comprehensive recycling location database that gives the user the ability to easily assemble a recycling to-do list. The database is location based, and aims to make your recycling needs as easy as possible, whether you’re clearing out the house during spring cleaning or simply looking to recycle a few shopping bags.

To check out more about recycling, visit Wendy’s blog at 1800Recycling.com.

FARGO MOORHEAD UPDATED THEIR RESPECTIVE RECYCLING PROGRAMS EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2012 TO INCLUDE PAPERBOARD AND PLASTICS #1 TO #7. For more information, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/fargo-moorhead-to-expand-recycling.

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by Wendy Gabriel

GREEN TIP: Reuse and recycle unwanted CDs and DVDs.

Every day, we use a multitude of different products: alarm clocks, clothes, backpacks, shoes, books, CD/DVD players, cell phones and the list goes on. Looking at a product’s life cycle helps us understand the connections between our purchases and the impact they make on our environment.

The life cycle of a CD or a DVD

Raw Materials:

CDs and DVDs are made from many different materials, each of which has its own separate life cycle involving energy use and waste. They include:

  • Aluminum—the most abundant metal element in the Earth’s crust. Bauxite ore is the main source of aluminum and is extracted from the Earth.
  • Polycarbonate—a type of plastic, which is made from crude oil and natural gas extracted from the Earth.
  • Lacquer—made of acrylic, another type of plastic.
  • Gold—a metal that is mined from the Earth.
  • Dyes—chemicals made in a laboratory, partially from petroleum products that come from the Earth.
  • Other materials such as water, glass, silver, and nickel.

Materials Processing:

Most mined materials must be processed before manufacturers can use them to make CDs or DVDs. For example, to make plastics, crude oil from the ground is combined with natural gas and chemicals in a manufacturing or processing plant.

Manufacturing:

The manufacturing process described is similar for both CDs and DVDs.

  • An injection molding machine creates the core of the disc—a 1-millimeter thick piece of polycarbonate (plastic). Polycarbonate is melted and put in a mold. With several tons of pressure, a stamper embeds tiny indentations, or pits, with digital information into the plastic mold. A CD-player’s laser reads these pits when playing a CD.
  • The plastic molds then go through the “metallizer” machine, which coats the CDs with a thin metal reflective layer (usually aluminum) through a process called “sputtering.” The playback laser reads the information off of the reflective aluminum surface.
  • The CD then receives a layer of lacquer as a protective coating against scratching and corrosion.
  • Most CDs are screen printed with one to five different colors for a decorative label. Screen printing involves the use of many materials, including stencils, squeegees,and inks.

Packaging:

CDs and DVDs are packaged in clear or colored plastic cases (jewel cases) or cardboard boxes—that are then covered with plastic shrink wrap. This packaging can be made from recycled or raw materials.

Source: CDRecyclingCenter.org

Here are some tips for Reducing, Reusing and Recycling

Reduce:

Instead of purchasing a new CD or DVD consider:

  • Borrowing it from a friend or the library.
  • Renting it from a local shop or a service like Netflix.
  • If you’re buying it for data storage, use an external hard drive or a service that keeps your files updated.
  • Buy used CDs/DVDs.

Reuse:

A great way to keep CDs/DVDs out of the landfills is to reuse them.

  • Minor scratches can be repaired by rubbing a mild abrasive (such as toothpaste) on the non- label side of a disc in a circular motion from the center out. Also, some commercial refinishers can inexpensively repair your CDs.
  • Donate unwanted CDs or DVDs to your local resale shop, schools or libraries.
  • Swap unwanted discs at Freecycle.org.

Recycle:

CDs/DVDs can be recycled for use in new products. Specialized electronic recycling companies clean, grind, blend and compound the discs into a high-quality plastic for a variety of uses.

Check out CDRecyclingCenter.org for information on how to send your CDs/DVDs for recycling.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

1800Recycling.com
1800Recycling.com is an awesome recycling and green living-focused website that makes recycling, conserving, reusing and living wisely easy.

The site features a recycling location database that gives the user the ability to easily assemble a recycling to-do list. The database is location based, and aims to make your recycling needs as easy as possible, whether you’re clearing out the house during spring cleaning or simply looking to recycle a few shopping bags.

Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Wednesday at WDAY.com.

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