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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. STARTING OCTOBER 13, 2014 A NEW TIME FOR THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM MEANS A NEW TIME FOR THIS SEGMENT… YOU CAN NOW STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 835AM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Christmas doesn’t have to be a drain on our planet. We can reduce the environmental impact of the holiday season with a little effort and imagination.

Here are some tips to help you celebrate the season while caring for the environment:Caleigh in an adaptation of the Nutcracker

Greener Gifts

  • Look for locally made gifts. Many products you find in big box stores come from halfway around the world, and the impact of transportation contributes greatly to greenhouse emissions and global warming. Local craft fairs and artisan shops are a good source for gifts that come without the added costs of transportation. And they are a way to give back to your local community.
    • Eco Chic Boutique – a green boutique specializing in eco-friendly, locally made, vintage and re-purposed items.
    • Unglued Market – a boutique featuring handmade items from the best local and regional artists, crafters, and makers. Also, vintage wares, creative workshops, and cupcakes from Bakeology and brewed coffee from Peace Coffee.
  • Look for gifts made from recycled sources. Many individuals and small businesses have developed great products using recycled materials. Supporting these businesses helps reduce the waste stream while promoting the concept of making best use of available materials. Some ideas:
    • ThinkEco2 – this company makes beautiful wooden gift boxes, planters and more from 100% recycled cedar. They would make a beautiful gift any time of the year.
    • The Green Glass Company – the largest producer of reclaimed glassware in the world, located in Wisconsin.
    • Uncommon Goods – an online marketplace offering creatively designed, high-quality merchandise at affordable prices including many handmade and gifts with recycled content.
  • Look for battery-free gifts. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), about 40% of all battery sales occur during the holiday season. Discarded batteries are an environmental hazard. Even rechargeable batteries find their way into the waste stream eventually.
  • Look for gifts that help make living green a little easier. For example, an awesome canvas bag for the man in your life like this one from www.fashionablenotes.com which reads, “Real Men Don’t Carry Paper of Plastic”.

Greener Holiday Lighting

The house with the most lights used to be the ‘best’. Times have changed. The cost of electricity goes way Christmas Tree in the Crystal Courtbeyond the utility bill. Electricity drains natural resources.

  • Reduce the size of outdoor lighting displays. A smaller presentation of lights can still be attractive, and more appropriate in the ‘season of giving’.
  • Use LED lights for house and Christmas tree lighting. LED (Light Emitting Diode) holiday lights use up to 95% less energy than larger, traditional holiday bulbs and last up to 100,000 hours when used indoors. LED holiday lights use .04 watts per bulb, 10 times less than mini bulbs and 100 times less than traditional holiday bulbs. Over a 30-day period, lighting 500 traditional holiday lights will cost you about $18.00 while the same number of LED lights costs only $0.19. As an added bonus, if one of the LED lights burns out the rest of the strand will stay lit.
  • Turn tree lights and outdoor house decorative lighting off at bedtime. It’s a waste of energy to leave the holiday lights on at night after everyone has gone to sleep.

Remember, never install lights with the power on. Test lights first, then unplug to install.

Source: Eartheasy.com

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Sustainable Baby Steps

This awesome site is full of great tips for getting you on the road to sustainable living. Sustainable Baby Steps is dedicated to guiding you to go green, save money and live healthy without stress, without needless spending and without overwhelming information.

When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.  ~John Muir

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. STARTING OCTOBER 13, 2014 A NEW TIME FOR THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM MEANS A NEW TIME FOR THIS SEGMENT… YOU CAN NOW STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 835AM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP:  Make your purchasing decisions based on informed choices.  Purchase products, whenever possible,Food For Change at the Fargo Theatre that are local and in-season, organic, made from sustainable materials, are fairly traded and have minimal packaging.

I once read a fabulous article by Laura Weldon entitled Your Beliefs Create the Marketplace. In the article she describes a growing trend of ethical consumers who make well-informed choices when “putting their money where their values are.” If you answer yes to any of the following, the “chances are good that you are one of those consumers.  Do you prefer to dine on organic foods?  Do you choose sweatshop-free clothing?  Do you search out sustainable building supplies?  Those choices are probably based on your awareness of today’s health, environmental and justice issues.  You care enough to make purchases consistent with your values. “This growing awareness has sparked a powerful consumer market.  Approximately 25 percent of adult Americans are considered to be part of this group.  Their purchasing decisions are orienting businesses toward more positive social, environmental and humane practices.” Ms. Weldon goes on to list the verifiable impact consumer choices are having:

  • According to the EPA, if every home in America replaced just one standard light bulb with an Energy Star compact florescent light bulb, this alone would save enough energy to light three million homes for a year ($600 million annual energy costs) and prevent greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to removing 800,000 cars from the road.
  • International products certified as Fair Trade (guaranteeing a non-exploitative relationship between buyer and seller) support the rights of workers in small-scale enterprises.  Transfair USA reports that villages benefiting from such income are opening craft cooperatives and health centers.  In one area alone, 1,600 acres where poppies and coca once grew for illicit drug trade are now devoted to growing organic coffee.
  • Research published by the National Resources Defense Council indicates that 423,900 trees could be saved if every household in the U.S. replaced just one 500-sheet roll of toilet paper with one made of all recycled fibers.
  • Purchasing local, in-season produce conserves petroleum.  The Organic Consumers Association reports that Small Business Saturdayprocessed foods travel an average of 3,600 miles in the journey from farm to table.  A meal made of locally produced ingredients uses four to 17 times less petroleum than one from typical supermarket products due to transportation requirements.
  • Check the Eat Well Guide to find organic and sustainable food in your area.

In an economy where we are trying to have our dollars stretch as far as possible, let’s make sure our purchases reflect our values.  Let’s send a message to big business.  Just because we don’t have a lot of disposable income we still demand high quality, healthy, sustainable products. As Ms. Weldon aptly writes, “Each conscious choice, each locally grown meal put on the table and every handcrafted chair purchased, makes a world of difference.”

LOCAL REMINDER: TODAY is the 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market

You can find a number of wonderful ingredients for your Thanksgiving meal and celebrate local foods at Concordia College in Moorhead. This year marks the 6th annual 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market at Concordia.

Where: the Atrium, Knutson Campus Center at Concordia College, 901 8th Street S., Moorhead MN 46462 When:  Tuesday, November 25th, 2014 at 3pm to 630pm

Each year more and more people celebrate a 100-Mile Thanksgiving by making their meal using only locally-produced food that is good for you and for the environment. The 100-Mile Thanksgiving Farmers Market will be an opportunity to fill your Thanksgiving table with products that are freshly harvested, locally sourced and sustainable. The market is co-hosted with Prairie Roots Food Co-op. Their online market at https://www.localfoodmarketplace.com/prairieroots/ will be open to the public November 22nd – 24th, 2014 and pre-ordered items will be available for pickup at the 100-Mile Thanksgiving Market. Additionally, several vendors will have items for sale on site.

For more information, contact Dr. Gretchen Harvey at harvey@cord.edu.

 

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Fair Trade USA

Fair Trade USA, a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, is the leading third-party certifier of Fair Trade products in the Fair Trade USAUnited States. Fair Trade USA audits and certifies transactions between U.S. companies and their international suppliers to guarantee that the farmers and workers producing Fair Trade Certified goods are paid fair prices and wages, work in safe conditions, protect the environment and receive community development funds to empower and uplift their communities. Fair Trade USA educates consumers, brings new manufacturers and retailers into the Fair Trade system, and provides farmers with tools, training and resources to thrive as international business people. Fair Trade Certified means:

  • Fair Prices
  • No GMOs
  • No Hazardous Chemicals
  • Environmental standards are built in to the certification
  • No Child Labor

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Food For Change is a feature-length documentary film focusing on food co-ops as a force for dynamic social and economic change in American culture. The movie tells the story of the cooperative movement in the U.S. through interviews, rare archival footage, and commentary by the filmmaker and social historians. This is the first film to examine the important historical role played by food co-ops, their pioneering quest for organic foods, and their current efforts to create regional food systems. Additionally, the film shows how the co-op movement strengthens communities where they are located, enhancing local economies and food security. The goal is to educate a wide national audience about the principles of cooperation with a focus on food. Source: Food For Change

I was fortunate to get a sneak peak of this film and it’s fantastic! I hope to see the Fargo Theatre full on November 3rd. As we try to get the Prairie Roots Food Co-op up and running, this is an important film for our community to view.

Food for Change

Book your tickets now for Food for Change, the new co-op movie premiering in Fargo on November 3rd, 2 pm at the Fargo Theater. www.food4change.eventbrite.com. After the film, there will be a panel discussion moderated by the awesome Christopher Gabriel.

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PRESS RELEASE — From September 22 through October 3, 2013,  Prairie Roots Food Co-op will celebrate the launch of their online market Prairie Roots Food Co-op Volunteerswith a Grand Opening by extending access to this online market to the public for two weeks.  Co-op Membership Coordinator Kaye Kirsch says, “This is a great opportunity to try out our online market before you become a co-op member.  It’s an easy way to buy natural, organic and local food from a variety of local farmers from the convenience of your own home.”

Prairie Roots Food Cooperative has opened this online marketplace in concert with their mission to build a healthy community by providing access to natural, organic and locally produced food.  This summer the market had a soft launch for all co-op members.  The market is now open every week and provides a variety of fresh local produce, grains, bread, honey, meat, soap and much more.

Each week local producers list items for sale on their website, www.localfoodsmarketplace.com/prairieroots. Members can log on and shop at their convenience from Sunday through Wednesday and then pick up their natural, organic and local food, produce and other items on Thursday evening from 5-7 PM at Gethsemane Cathedral in south Fargo.

The Honey B Soap CompanyCo-op members are finding Prairie Roots Online a convenient and easy way to access local food.  Co-op member Beth Bradley said “I picked up my first food order from Prairie Roots Food Co-op’s virtual market and everything was delicious!  It’s such a convenient way to buy locally grown organic food from several farmers all from one convenient pick up place.”

They plan to continue to add producers. This is a first step toward opening a full-line retail grocery store in the metro area which will also be open to the public.

Prairie Roots Food Co-op is member owned and is now recruiting new Doubting Thomas Farmsmembers in order to build a broad base of community support prior to store opening.  A lifetime membership is $300 per household with a variety of payment plans starting at $25 every six months.  More information, including an online membership application, is available at their website: www.prairie-roots.coop.

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Prairie Roots Food Cooperative is dedicated to building a healthy community by providing access to natural, organic, and locally produced food.  The future food co-op will be a member-owned natural foods, full-service, retail grocery store in the Fargo-Moorhead area that will be open to both members and the public.  Prairie Roots seeks to provide educational opportunities to members of our community and support producers who utilize sustainable and socially responsible production methods.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM. WE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Get involved in your local food co-op. Food co-ops are people working together for better food, Local, organic saladstronger communities and a healthier world.

A new study, Healthy Foods Healthy Communities: The Social and Economic Impacts of Food Co-ops (commissioned by the National Cooperative Grocers Association (NCGA) and the ICA Group), quantifies the impact food co-ops have as compared to conventional grocery stores. The study’s compelling results demonstrate the many ways that food co-ops do well while doing good.

Some ways food co-ops make a stronger community and a healthier world:

  • They strengthen the local economy
    • The economic impact that a grocery store has on its local economy is greater than just the sum of its local spending, because a portion of money spent locally recirculates. For example, food co-ops purchase from local farmers who, in turn, buy supplies from local sources, hire local technicians to repair equipment, and purchase goods and services from local retailers. According to the study, for every $1,000 a shopper spends at their local food co-op, $1,604 in economic activity is generated in their local economy—$239 more than if they had spent that same $1,000 at a conventional grocer.
  • They create community
  • They provide a reliable marketplace for local farmers, artists, and other entrepreneurs
  • They are an educational center
    • Locally as we work together to build Prairie Roots Food Co-op there are already educational opportunities like the upcoming class: Food Preservation Skills: Make Your Own Pectin. If you’re interested, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/368386999957342/ for more information.
  • They promote healthy eating
  • They engage in environmental stewardship
    • Grocery stores—co-ops and conventional alike—generate a significant amount of waste. What sets retail food co-ops apart is what they do with that waste. According to the study results, co-ops recycle 96 percent of cardboard, 74 percent of food waste and 81 percent of plastics compared to 91 percent, 36 percent and 29 percent, respectively, recycled by conventional grocers.

How Does Your Grocery Store Checkout

Infographic Source: Stronger Together.coop

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:Prairie Roots Co-op

Prairie Roots Food Cooperative

In the Fargo Moorhead area, Prairie Roots Food Cooperative is dedicated to building a healthy community by providing access to natural, organic, and locally produced food. A lifetime membership is $300 per household with a variety of payment plans to suit every budget. More information, including an online membership application, is available at their website: www.prairie-roots.coop.

On July 7th, the Prairie Roots Online Market opened for business. Each week local producers list items for sale on Prairie Roots Food Cooperative’s website. Members can log on and shop at their convenience from Sunday through Wednesday and then pick up their natural, organic and local food, produce and other items on Thursday evening.

The future food co-op grocery store will be a member-owned natural foods, full-service, retail grocery store in the Fargo-Moorhead area that will be open to both members and the public. Prairie Roots seeks to provide educational opportunities to members of our community and support producers who utilize sustainable and socially responsible production methods.

UPCOMING

Food Preservation Skills: Make Your Own Pectin with Kaye Kirsch

Pectin is what makes jams and jellies thick. It is naturally occurring in some fruits and is required in many jam recipes. Pectin can be purchased in many forms, but why buy it when you can make your own? In this class you’ll see a demonstration of making pectin (aka: green apple jelly) from start to finish. I’ll touch on the basics of water bath canning using the standard metal lids, Tattler reusable lids and Weck jars. All three methods will also be demonstrated. Attendees will receive recipes for green apple jelly and other jams made using this form of pectin. We’ll also sample some jams made with green apple jelly and you’ll get some pectin to take home with you. LOCATION: Dakota Medical Foundation, 4334 18th Ave S, Fargo DATE: Monday, August 12 from 7 – 9 PM.

For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/368386999957342/ and check out Prairie Roots other upcoming events.

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