EWG Food News

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Eat your fruits and vegetables. Make informed choices to reduce the amount of pesticides you and your family are eating and buy organic produce whenever possible, it’s healthier for you and for the planet.

Let me also say that it’s SO important to eat your fruits and vegetables… organic or not. If organic isn’t an option, pick the fruits and vegetables anyway because it’s better than not eating them at all.

Nutritionists recommend that adults and children consume at least two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables daily (CDC 2009). The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that this advice is not being followed – less than a third of adults meet the current guidelines. Even more disturbing, only one in three high school students ate enough fruit, and less than one in five ate the recommended number of vegetables (CDC 2009a).

The health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables outweigh the risks of pesticide exposure. Eating conventionally grown produce is far better than skipping fruits and vegetables. But with the Environmental Working Group’s Shopper’s Guide, consumers don’t have to choose between pesticides and healthy diets.

Each year the Environmental Working Group (EWG) publishes the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides. The Guide is developed based on data from nearly 96,000 tests for pesticide residues in produce. There are two lists. The “Dirty Dozen” lists produce varieties that have most pesticide contamination so you should always buy these organic or avoid them. The other list is the “Clean 15“, the produce the EWG has found to have the least pesticide contamination.

We’ve talked before about avoiding toxic chemicals when you’re Green(ing) Your Lawn. We don’t want pesticides entering our bodies through our skin and we certainly don’t want to injest them. The EWG points out that there is a growing consensus in the scientific community that even small doses of pesticides and other chemicals can have adverse effects on health, especially during vulnerable periods such as fetal development and childhood. The bottom line is that when it comes to pesticide use, there is more to consider than just the residues that you are ingesting. Although peeled foods such as mangoes, avocados and kiwis may spare the consumer from significant pesticide exposure, it is possible that large amounts of pesticides and herbicides are used on the farms from which these originate, contaminating groundwater, promoting erosion and otherwise damaging local ecosystems. To help promote the health of the planet as well as your own health, it’s best to buy organic whenever possible.

DIRTY DOZEN (2012) – Buy These Organic

1
AppleApples
2
CeleryCelery
3
Red PepperSweet bell peppers
4
PeachesPeaches
5
StrawberriesStrawberries
6
NectarinesNectarines – imported
7
GrapesGrapes
8
SpinachSpinach
9
LettuceLettuce
10
CucumberCucumbers
11
BlueberriesBlueberries – domestic
12
PotatoePotatoes
Plus
+
Green BeansGreen beans
+
KaleKale/Greens
+ May contain pesticide residues of special concern

The Dirty Dozen was expanded with a Plus category to highlight two crops — green beans and leafy greens, meaning, kale and collard greens – that did not meet traditional Dirty Dozen criteria but were commonly contaminated with highly toxic organophosphate insecticides. These insecticides are toxic to the nervous system and have been largely removed from agriculture over the past decade. But they are not banned and still show up on some food crops.

Commodity crop corn used for animal feed and biofuels is almost all produced with genetically modified (GMO) seeds, as is some sweet corn sold for human consumption. Since GMO sweet corn is not labeled as such in US stores, EWG advises those who have concerns about GMOs to buy organic sweet corn.

CLEAN 15 (2012) – Lowest in Pesticides
1
OnionsOnions
2
Sweet CornSweet Corn (but if you are concerned about GMOs buy organic sweet corn)
3
PineapplePineapples
4
AvocadoAvocado
5
CabbageCabbage
6
PeasSweet peas
7
AsparagusAsparagus
8
MangoMangoes
9
EggplantEggplant
10
KiwiKiwi
11
CantelopeCantaloupe – domestic
12
Sweet PotatoesSweet potatoes
13
GrapefruitGrapefruit
14
WatermelonWatermelon
15
MushroomsMushrooms

Source: DrWeil.com and EWG.org

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

EWG’s Food News

You can find a detailed description of the criteria the EWG used to develop their rankings and the complete list of fruits and vegetables tested at their dedicated website, www.foodnews.org. Read the FAQs for more eye opening information.

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