recycling

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. STARTING OCTOBER 13, 2014 A NEW TIME FOR THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM MEANS A NEW TIME FOR THIS SEGMENT… YOU CAN NOW STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 835AM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: As we head towards a New Year it is always a good idea to take a moment to examine if there are any eco-friendly additions you could make in your day-to-day life.  As Oprah so beautifully put it, “Cheers to a new year and another chance for us to get it right.”

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Start recycling. To reduce the amount of waste you produce, stop buying disposable products when there are reusable versions available. Reuse everything, donate gently used items to charity and always recycle as much as you can. The energy saved from recycling a single aluminum can will operate a television for three hours.
  • Bring your own bag. Paper or plastic? Neither is the best choice. Twelve million barrels of oil are used to make the 88.5 billion plastic bags consumed in the United States each year. And it takes four times more energy to make paper bags. (Source: The Daily Green) The best choice is to bring your own reusable shopping bags. Put a few in your car so you have them handy on your next shopping trip. And if you happen to forget your reusable bag (as we all do), choose paper if you will recycle it or plastic if you will reuse or recycle it.
  • Clean Green. Instead of buying costly cleaning products that are full of toxic chemicals, use greener cleaning options like white vinegar, baking soda and some lemons. Healthier for your family, your wallet and the environment.
    • Tub and tile cleaner: Use half a lemon with a sprinkle of baking soda on it to scrub your tub and tiles. I also clean my kitchen sink and counter tops using this method.
    • Oven cleaner: Sprinkle baking soda in your oven and spray it with water, making it into a paste. Let it sit, periodically spraying it when it dries. Then wipe off. Your oven will be sparkling clean without the toxic fumes.
    • Window cleaner: Fill a spray bottle with water and ¼ cup white vinegar. Use a soft cloth or newspaper to wipe.
    • All-Purpose Cleaner: Full strength white vinegar will disinfect and clean just as effectively as harsh toxic chemicals without harming your family.
  • Stop Buying Paper Towels. According to MaryJanesFarm, Americans go through about 2.5 million tons ofChristmas time paper towels annually, and even the ones made from recycled materials usually end up in landfills. Use organic cotton cloths instead.
  • Buy Less Stuff. My Nana grew up during the Depression-era and her motto has always been, “Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without”! All of our homes are filled with stuff we don’t need. There are even TV shows that help us get rid of all the stuff. Let’s start not buying the stuff we don’t need in the first place. Before you enter a store make a detailed list. Before you purchase something not on your list ask yourself where you’ll put it when you get it home. Do you really need it?
  • Take Five Minutes Each Day To Breathe: Or meditate, or pray. Anything that will reduce stress and help you to stop and refresh your body and soul.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

The Green Guide
The Green Guide and www.thegreenguide.com are published by The Green Guide Institute (TGGI), an independent research and information organization for consumers. Dubbed the “green living source for today’s conscious consumer”, The Green Guide is an invaluable resource for men and women, from young adults to grandparents, striving for a healthy and “greener” lifestyle. It is TGGI’s vision that one day The Green Guide will be, for millions of consumers, the go-to source of information about practical everyday, environmentally responsible and health-minded product choices and actions. Their goal is to ensure that The Green Guide and www.thegreenguide.com serve as your most practical, reliable, and trustworthy content source for product choices and daily practices that are better for health and the environment.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAM. WE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY

GREEN TIP: After being cooped up in your house all winter long, it’s (finally) time to fling open the windows, The Clothesline by Caleighshoo away the cobwebs and tackle your annual spring cleaning. When you’re organizing your spring cleaning keep in mind that switching to green cleaning products will improve your health, lessen adverse environmental impacts and save money.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), of the 2,863 most commonly used chemicals only 7% have complete toxicity data and 43% have NO toxicity information available.

A few of my favorite green cleaning recipes/tips:

GLASS CLEANER:

  • Mix white vinegar and filtered water in a spray bottle. Reduce waste by using a soft cloth or newspaper instead of paper towels (and they leave a better finish).

ALL-PURPOSE CLEANER:

  • Dissolve 4 tablespoons of baking soda in 1 quart of warm water, or;
  • Mix 1 part white vinegar to 3 parts water.

TUB AND TILE:

  • Mix 1 & 2/3 cups baking soda, ½ cup liquid castile soap and ½ cup water. Add 2 tablespoons white vinegar, or;
  • Use half a lemon with a sprinkle of baking soda on it. Rinse with water or white vinegar.

For more green spring cleaning recipes, visit Green Tip – Spring Cleaning.

LOCALLY:Cleanup Week

ELECTRONICS RECYCLING EVENTS – May 3rd

Fargo:

  • Electronics such as televisions and computers should not be set out for pickup. Instead, please recycle them during our Electronics Recycling Event on Saturday, May 3 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fargo Solid Waste, 2301 8th Ave. N. For more information, call 701-241-1449.

Clay County:

  • Clay County will be hosting a special collection for residential TVs, computer monitors, and computers on Saturday, May 3, 2014 from 8 a.m. – noon The collection will be held at the Household Hazardous Waste Facility site at 2729 HWY 10 East, Moorhead. This collection is for residential e-waste only.

CLEANUP WEEK – May 5th to 9th

This time of year means Cleanup Week for the Fargo Moorhead area. This year Clean Up Week is May 5th through 9th, 2014. This annual event cleans up our cities by giving residents an opportunity to dispose of tires, appliances and other large items at no charge on their garbage collection day.

If you have items that can be reused, consider donating them to a local charity. Many will come to your house and pick up your items.

If you have reusable items such as appliances, furniture or building materials that you would like to recycle, visit the ReStore Web site at www.lakeagassizhabitat.org.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Cleanupweek.com

This site lists all the rules for Cleanup Week. For example, here are the Cleanup Week rules for all cities:

  • Separate items of the same type into distinct piles (tires, appliances, furniture, brush, household garbage, etc.). Separate trucks collect the items.
  • Place garbage in disposable containers, except for oversized items.
  • Items will be collected on your normal garbage pickup day. Do not set items out more than one day early.
  • Crews will not return to pick up garbage set out too late.
  • Remove refrigerator and freezer doors. Do not place food or any other waste inside appliances.
  • Items must be from residences; no commercial waste will be accepted. Keep household garbage at least four feet away from other Cleanup Week items.

There are also separate links for additional cleanup rules for Fargo, Moorhead, Dilworth, West Fargo and Clay County.

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An interesting look at the amount of trash produced, the percentage of waste recycled, and the impact of recycling in America since the 1960′s. Thank you FastHaul for sharing this with us.

Wasted in America Infographic about consumer waste and recycling
Courtesy of: Fast Haul

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Become familiar with your local recycling policies and prepare your recycling accordingly.

We’ve had some exciting recycling news this week. On July 1st, the Cities of Fargo and Moorhead expanded their recycling programs to accept paperboard and more types of plastic.

Instead of just accepting corrugated cardboard residents of both cities can now include cereal boxes, milk and juice cartons, shoe boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

From the City of Fargo:

Acceptable cardboard: Corrugated cardboard boxes, brown kraft bags, beverage containers, shoe boxes cereal and food boxes, chipboard and paperboard.

Unacceptable cardboard: Waxed boxes or boxes that come from refrigerator or the freezer.

Preparation required: Large boxes should be flattened and placed under container. Please slit seams on smaller boxes and flatten.

Also, instead of only accepting plastic containers with the “resin identification code,” or RIC inside the chasing arrow symbol of 1 or 2, they will now be accepting the RIC of 1 through 7.

From the City of Fargo:

Acceptable plastics: #1-7 Clean plastic containers such as soda bottles, milk containers, detergent and shampoo bottles, yogurt & cottage cheese containers, ice cream pails, margarine tubs and vegetable containers. All containers with a recycling symbol of 1-7.

Unacceptable plastics: Styrofoam, beverage cups, trays or fast food containers. Motor oil or antifreeze bottles, plastic bags, shrink wrap, film, toys.

Preparation required: Please rinse all containers and remove caps and lids. Place plastic in a brown paper bag.

For more information, visit http://www.cityoffargo.com/CityInfo/Departments/SolidWaste/Recycling/.

RECYCLING FACTS from the National Resources Defense Council:

  • The U.S. currently recycles 32.5 percent of its waste, compared with about five percent in 1970.
  • According to the EPA, recycling cuts global warming pollution by the equivalent of removing 39.6 million passenger cars from the road.
  • Before 1973, no curbside recycling programs existed in the United States. By 2006, about 8,660 curbside programs had sprouted up across the nation.
  • Less than half of all post-consumer paper discarded in the United States is recovered for recycling.
  • Only 13 percent of water bottles are recycled. In 2005, Americans purchased 30 billion water bottles, and 26 billion of them wound up in landfills.
  • Airports and airlines recycle less than 20 percent of the 425,000 tons of passenger-related waste they produce each year.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or landfill, is a goal we all work towards. What are some ways you reduce your waste?

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

1800Recycling.com
1800Recycling.com is a dynamic recycling and green living-focused website that makes recycling, conserving, reusing and living wisely easy.

The site also features a comprehensive recycling database that gives the user the ability to easily assemble a recycling to-do list. The database is location based to make your recycling needs as easy as possible whether you’re clearing out the house during spring cleaning or simply looking to recycle a few shopping bags.

To read more articles from Wendy about recycling, visit http://1800recycling.com/author/wendy-gabriel/.

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Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Wednesday at WDAY.com or, if you’re in North Dakota or western Minnesota, listen on your radio at AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Become familiar with your local recycling policies and prepare your recycling accordingly.

As a recent transplant to the Fargo Moorhead area, I was surprised to discovered that nobody in our area recycles paperboard/boxboard (cereal boxes) so I decided I needed to take a look at what we can recycle.

Not everything can be recycled, but you should be able to find recycling facilities for these six main categories of household waste:

  • Paper
  • Plastics
  • Glass
  • Metals
  • Organics
  • Textiles

The City of Fargo offers free curbside recycling for residents along with 26 drop-off locations throughout Fargo for the collection of recyclables. Twelve of the sites have containers for all recyclables, including yard waste. They accept aluminum cans and tin/metal cans. They cannot accept scrap metal, nails, tin foil, aerosol cans (if empty, throw out) or paint cans.

Cans, glass and plastic

They accept clear, brown and green glass bottles and jars. Blue glass containers can be placed with green glass. Labels do not need to be removed, however, please remove caps. We cannot accept ceramics, window glass, Pyrex, or standard light bulbs (fluorescent bulbs should be brought to the Household Hazardous Waste facility.)

They accept plastic bottles with a neck that have the #1 or #2 recycling symbol. Please empty, rinse and remove caps and rings before recycling. They cannot accept plastic containers #3 or higher, plastic bags, motor oil containers or vegetable oil bottles.

Corrugated cardboard

They accept corrugated cardboard boxes (with the wavy edge) and brown paper bags. Examples include mailing/shipping boxes, clean pizza box tops and some beverage boxes (most are not corrugated so check to be sure!).

They cannot accept used pizza boxes, wax-coated cardboard, soda cases, or boxboard (non-corrugated boxes such as cereal, shoe, and cigarette-type boxes).

Magazines and newspapers

They accept magazines and small catalogs with glossy pages.

They cannot accept catalogs with glued bindings, such as those from department stores or phone books (these are recycled in a special, short-term collection held each year).

We accept newspapers and shoppers (i.e. the Midweek) including their glossy inserts.

Source: City of Fargo

Shampoo/conditioner bottle caps

Aveda has a bottle cap recycling program. Bring your hard plastic caps to Aveda and they will use it to make new ones.

Plastic bags

We’ve talked about plastic bags in a previous Green Tip, Green Tip – Bring Your Own Bag. If you happen to find yourself with one, you can recycle it at most area grocery stores. Hornbacher’s, for example, has a plastic bag recycling bin as you enter the grocery store.

Getting back to those cereal boxes. I was initially frustrated that our area doesn’t recycle them but now I’m looking at it as an opportunity to reduce more waste. I’m going to buy bulk ingredients (in my own containers) and make my own granola.

Reducing our waste before it becomes recycling or landfill, is a goal we all work towards. What are some ways you reduce your waste?

My Green Side’s web pick of the week

1800Recycling.com
1800Recycling.com is a dynamic recycling and green living-focused website that makes recycling, conserving, reusing and living wisely easy.

The site also features a comprehensive recycling location database that gives the user the ability to easily assemble a recycling to-do list. The database is location based, and aims to make your recycling needs as easy as possible, whether you’re clearing out the house during spring cleaning or simply looking to recycle a few shopping bags.

To check out more about recycling, visit Wendy’s blog at 1800Recycling.com.

FARGO MOORHEAD UPDATED THEIR RESPECTIVE RECYCLING PROGRAMS EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2012 TO INCLUDE PAPERBOARD AND PLASTICS #1 TO #7. For more information, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/fargo-moorhead-to-expand-recycling.

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by Wendy Gabriel

GREEN TIP: Reuse and recycle unwanted CDs and DVDs.

Every day, we use a multitude of different products: alarm clocks, clothes, backpacks, shoes, books, CD/DVD players, cell phones and the list goes on. Looking at a product’s life cycle helps us understand the connections between our purchases and the impact they make on our environment.

The life cycle of a CD or a DVD

Raw Materials:

CDs and DVDs are made from many different materials, each of which has its own separate life cycle involving energy use and waste. They include:

  • Aluminum—the most abundant metal element in the Earth’s crust. Bauxite ore is the main source of aluminum and is extracted from the Earth.
  • Polycarbonate—a type of plastic, which is made from crude oil and natural gas extracted from the Earth.
  • Lacquer—made of acrylic, another type of plastic.
  • Gold—a metal that is mined from the Earth.
  • Dyes—chemicals made in a laboratory, partially from petroleum products that come from the Earth.
  • Other materials such as water, glass, silver, and nickel.

Materials Processing:

Most mined materials must be processed before manufacturers can use them to make CDs or DVDs. For example, to make plastics, crude oil from the ground is combined with natural gas and chemicals in a manufacturing or processing plant.

Manufacturing:

The manufacturing process described is similar for both CDs and DVDs.

  • An injection molding machine creates the core of the disc—a 1-millimeter thick piece of polycarbonate (plastic). Polycarbonate is melted and put in a mold. With several tons of pressure, a stamper embeds tiny indentations, or pits, with digital information into the plastic mold. A CD-player’s laser reads these pits when playing a CD.
  • The plastic molds then go through the “metallizer” machine, which coats the CDs with a thin metal reflective layer (usually aluminum) through a process called “sputtering.” The playback laser reads the information off of the reflective aluminum surface.
  • The CD then receives a layer of lacquer as a protective coating against scratching and corrosion.
  • Most CDs are screen printed with one to five different colors for a decorative label. Screen printing involves the use of many materials, including stencils, squeegees,and inks.

Packaging:

CDs and DVDs are packaged in clear or colored plastic cases (jewel cases) or cardboard boxes—that are then covered with plastic shrink wrap. This packaging can be made from recycled or raw materials.

Source: CDRecyclingCenter.org

Here are some tips for Reducing, Reusing and Recycling

Reduce:

Instead of purchasing a new CD or DVD consider:

  • Borrowing it from a friend or the library.
  • Renting it from a local shop or a service like Netflix.
  • If you’re buying it for data storage, use an external hard drive or a service that keeps your files updated.
  • Buy used CDs/DVDs.

Reuse:

A great way to keep CDs/DVDs out of the landfills is to reuse them.

  • Minor scratches can be repaired by rubbing a mild abrasive (such as toothpaste) on the non- label side of a disc in a circular motion from the center out. Also, some commercial refinishers can inexpensively repair your CDs.
  • Donate unwanted CDs or DVDs to your local resale shop, schools or libraries.
  • Swap unwanted discs at Freecycle.org.

Recycle:

CDs/DVDs can be recycled for use in new products. Specialized electronic recycling companies clean, grind, blend and compound the discs into a high-quality plastic for a variety of uses.

Check out CDRecyclingCenter.org for information on how to send your CDs/DVDs for recycling.

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

1800Recycling.com
1800Recycling.com is an awesome recycling and green living-focused website that makes recycling, conserving, reusing and living wisely easy.

The site features a recycling location database that gives the user the ability to easily assemble a recycling to-do list. The database is location based, and aims to make your recycling needs as easy as possible, whether you’re clearing out the house during spring cleaning or simply looking to recycle a few shopping bags.

Editor’s Note: Each Wednesday My Green Side brings Simple Tips for Green Living to The Christopher Gabriel Program. We also highlight a favorite green site each week. You can stream the segment at approximately 1220pm (central) every Wednesday at WDAY.com.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: EACH TUESDAY MY GREEN SIDE BRINGS SIMPLE TIPS FOR GREEN LIVING TO THE CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL PROGRAMWE ALSO HIGHLIGHT A FAVORITE GREEN SITE EACH WEEK. YOU CAN STREAM THE SEGMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1220PM (CENTRAL) EVERY TUESDAY AT WDAY.COM OR, IF YOU’RE IN NORTH DAKOTA OR WESTERN MINNESOTA, LISTEN ON YOUR RADIO AT AM970 WDAY.

GREEN TIP: Baby Greek goddess and trikeFind alternate uses for everyday products and you will save money and the environment at the same time.

Here are some tips you can use today:

1. Line a Vegetable Drawer

Keep vegetables fresh by lining refrigerator drawer.

Use the newspaper to line vegetable drawers in your refrigerator. The newspapers will absorb moisture and reduce smells.

2. Ease Snoring

Ease snoring with a little olive oil before bed.

A little olive oil before bed will moisturize and lubricate your throat muscles and help eliminate snoring. Sip olive oil before bed.

3. Bicycle Chain Lubricant

Lubricate your bike chain with olive oil.

4. Fertilizer

Use coffee grounds to fertilize plants.

To fertilize plants, especially carrots and radishes. Before you plant, mix your carrot and radish seeds with used coffee grounds. You’ll increase your carrot and radish size and amount, and the grounds will also ward away any underground pests attracted to your veggies.

5. Acne or Aging Skin

Give yourself an aspirin facial to eliminate acne.

The salicylic acid in aspirin makes for a great facial for acne or aging skin. Crush 5-10 non-coated aspirin tablets; add small dab of water and plain yogurt and spread on your face avoiding the eye area.

6. Breath Freshener

Use lemon wedges to eliminate bad breath.

Take a lemon wedge and rub over teeth and tongue to get rid of bad breath.

7. Stain Remover

Remove stubborn stains from carpet and fabrics with hydrogen peroxide.

Hydrogen peroxide will remove stains from fruit juice, coffee, wine and even blood from fabrics and carpet. It is recommended, as with all cleaning solutions, to test it on a small area first.

8. Remove Excess Salt from Soups

Use apples or potatoes to remove the salt content from soups.

Accidentally get a little heavy handed with the salt shaker? Simply drop a few apple (or potato) wedges in your pot. After cooking for another 10 minutes or so, remove the wedges and out comes the excess salt.

9. Rust Remover

Use Coca Cola to remove rust.

Coca Cola and a mildly abrasive cloth will remove most rust stains. Use Coca Cola and a little elbow grease to clean up a rusty bumper.

10. Clean Eye Glasses

Clean eye glasses with vodka or rubbing alcohol and a cloth.

Wipe the lenses with a soft, clean cloth dampened with vodka or rubbing alcohol. The alcohol cleans the glass and kills germs.

Source: AltUse.com

My Green Side’s web pick of the week:

Glue and Glitter

Glue and Glitter contains great tips, green crafts and amazing recipes. It is full of ways to repurpose everyday items that would end up in a landfill into something wonderful.

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CFLs

By Wendy Gabriel

GREEN TIP:  Replace at least one light bulb in your home, office, etc. with a compact fluorescent light. 

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, if every American home replaced just one light bulb with a compact fluorescent light (CFLs), we would prevent greenhouse gases equivalent to the emissions of more than 800,000 cars!  For more information, check out their website: http://www.energystar.gov.

OK. . . that sounds easy. . . as my current light bulbs burn out, I will replace them with CFLs!  Well . . . not so easy . . . who knew that my husband has an aesthetic aversion to CFLs?!?  Apparently he is a frustrated lighting designer with an evil plan to destroy the earth, but I digress.  I have managed to change out the laundry room light (not a place he frequents . . . much) and the garage lights (an obvious compromise).  I will not give up!  I will stealthily change each and every light in the house!!! 

A word of caution:  According to the Environmental Protection Agency, compact fluorescent lights contain a small amount of mercury sealed within the glass tubing.  They recommend that consumers take advantage of local recycling options for compact fluorescent light bulbs. EPA is working with CFL manufacturers and major U.S. retailers to expand recycling and disposal options. Consumers can contact their local municipal solid waste agency directly, or go to http://www.epa.gov/bulbrecycling or http://www.earth911.org to identify local recycling options.

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